New fund launched for programmes that encourage use of standard English

The Funding Support Scheme, which has no cap, was announced at the movement's symposium on Saturday (July15) as part of its launch.
The Funding Support Scheme, which has no cap, was announced at the movement's symposium on Saturday (July15) as part of its launch. PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM SPEAK GOOD ENGLISH MOVEMENT

SINGAPORE - Projects that raise awareness of the importance of using good English and encouraging the use of standard English can now receive funding from the Speak Good English Movement.

The Funding Support Scheme, which has no cap, was announced at the movement's symposium on Saturday (July15) as part of its launch.

Its chairman Goh Eck Kheng, the publisher of Landmark Books, said: "Creating a good English language environment in Singapore is a collective goal. It is as much the movement's role as it is the responsibility of every Singaporean.

"We are very heartened to know that there are individuals and groups who are keen on helping others improve their standard of English.

"We hope that these funds will help get plans and ideas off the ground, and inspire others to support the movement."

The projects will be assessed based on the following criteria: effectiveness in encouraging the use of standard English; reach and engagement of audience, credentials of the organisation or individual; and the sustainability of the programme.

Applicants can download the programme proposal and funding support request form from http://goodenglish.org.sg/programme-support

The movement is in its 17th year.

Speakers at the symposium included litigator Adrian Tan, digital writer Melanie Lee and master teacher William Anthony Grosse. The speakers shared ways to help others improve their command of the language over three discussion sessions: English in the Singaporean Home, Effective English at Work and English, Singlish and Broken English.

For the session on English in the Singaporean Home, the speakers shared the importance of creating routines and activities to inculcate good habits such as reading regularly and reading aloud.

Mr Grosse said: "The home provides both the security and safety and also the energy to want to use the language, to want to savour the language and to want to explore the language."