Musician reaching out to migrant workers in Little India

Migrant workers play cricket in a field at the junction of Hampshire road and Northumberland road, near race course road, on Sunday afternoon, Dec 15, 2013. -- ST PHOTO: NADARAJAN RAJENDRAN 
Migrant workers play cricket in a field at the junction of Hampshire road and Northumberland road, near race course road, on Sunday afternoon, Dec 15, 2013. -- ST PHOTO: NADARAJAN RAJENDRAN 
Mr John Chan, 50, (centre) handing out fliers to migrant workers around little India arcade. The flyer carries a message in English and Tamil saying "We care for foreign workers". -- ST PHOTO: NADARAJAN RAJENDRAN 
Mr John Chan, 50, (centre) handing out fliers to migrant workers around little India arcade. The flyer carries a message in English and Tamil saying "We care for foreign workers". -- ST PHOTO: NADARAJAN RAJENDRAN 
Mr John Chan, 50, (right) handing out fliers to migrant workers around little India arcade. The flyer carries a message in English and Tamil saying "We care for foreign workers". -- ST PHOTO: NADARAJAN RAJENDRAN 
Mr John Chan, 50, (right) handing out fliers to migrant workers around little India arcade. The flyer carries a message in English and Tamil saying "We care for foreign workers". -- ST PHOTO: NADARAJAN RAJENDRAN 

Musician John Chan is spreading some good cheer among migrant workers in Little India on Sunday, a week after a riot that broke out in the area.

For the past two days, the 50-year-old has been giving out flyers that read, "We Care About Workers," written in English and Tamil. "I just want to tell these workers, in my own way, that the incident has passed and that everybody should move on," he told The Straits Times on Sunday afternoon.

He said he starts a conversation with basic Tamil phrases he picked up from his friends, and distributes the flyers - of which he printed over 200 copies. Some workers were seen approaching Mr Chan, asking to keep a copy at home.

Mr Chan said he spent an hour distributing flyers and chatting with workers yesterday, and intends to do so on Sunday until all of them have been given out.

"This is just a proactive way of understanding our migrant worker community in Singapore," he said. "They are certainly not troublemakers."

Construction worker S Kumar, 26, said he was touched to receive such a flyer. "Actually I only go to Little India once a month to send money and talk to friends. I hope Singapore doesn't think we are all bad people. We are just trying to make money to send home," he said.