Morning Minutes: What will make headlines, Nov 25, 2016

President of Boys Brigade Singapore Professor Ho Yew Kee with his son Mr Ho Yi Shyan, chairman of Boy's Brigade Share-a-Gift (BBSG) project Mr Lui Chong Chee, and two other BB members, handing out food hampers to Madam Zainubi Abdul Majid on Dec 18,
President of Boys Brigade Singapore Professor Ho Yew Kee with his son Mr Ho Yi Shyan, chairman of Boy's Brigade Share-a-Gift (BBSG) project Mr Lui Chong Chee, and two other BB members, handing out food hampers to Madam Zainubi Abdul Majid on Dec 18, 2015.PHOTO: ST FILE

Good morning! Morning Minutes is a round-up of stories that will break on Friday (Nov 25) and which we think you'd be interested in.

It appears on weekdays, available by 7am. 

SHARE A GIFT WITH THE UNDERPRIVILEGED

The Boys’ Brigade Share-a-Gift campaign, one of Singapore’s biggest year-end charity projects, returns this Christmas season for its 29th run of bringing cheer to the underprivileged. This year, the project aims to make a difference to the lives of almost 40,000 beneficiaries. The campaign kicks off on Friday (Nov 25) and will run till Dec 19. 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION FIGURES TO BE RELEASED


An employee works on the cell production line at the REC Solar ASA manufacturing plant in Singapore on Sept 5, 2014. PHOTO: BLOOMBERG

Singapore's industrial production figures for October are due at 1pm. Factory output grew for a second straight month in September, up by a stronger than expected 6.7 per cent from a year ago. Today's numbers will show if manufacturing can hold up in the absence of a recovery in exports. 

PROTESTERS TO TAKE TO JAKARTA'S STREETS


Muslim hardline protesters clash with anti-riot policemen during a protest against Jakarta's incumbent governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama in Jakarta on Nov 4, 2016. PHOTO: REUTERS 

Around 18,000 policemen will patrol Jakarta's streets on Friday (Nov 25) to prevent any untoward incident during planned demonstrations against Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama over alleged blasphemy. 

While President Joko Widodo and moderate Muslim groups have appealed for restraint, the police fear that some demonstrators may use the rallies as a means to destabilise the government. 

One hardline group, the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI), which staged the biggest rally Indonesia has seen in years on November 4, has said its members plan to march again on Friday, though they pledged it would be peaceful.