Morning Minutes: What will make headlines, May 27, 2016

People protesting against the visit to Hiroshima by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and US President Barack Obama at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on May 26, 2016.
People protesting against the visit to Hiroshima by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and US President Barack Obama at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on May 26, 2016.PHOTO: EPA

Good morning! Morning Minutes is a round-up of stories that will break on Friday, May 27, and which we think you'd be interested in.

It appears on weekdays, available by 7am.

Obama to visit Hiroshima today

Mr Barack Obama will visit Hiroshima today, becoming the first sitting US President to go to the city since it suffered the world's first nuclear bombing on Aug 6, 1945.

Mr Obama, who will be accompanied by Japanese Premier Shinzo Abe, is expected to lay flowers at the cenotaph in Hiroshima. He will also speak at the spot and could meet some of the ageing survivors of the blast, which claimed the lives of 140,000 people, some of whom died immediately in a ball of searing heat, while many succumbed to injuries or radiation-related illnesses afterwards.

Mr Obama said on Thursday he will not offer an apology for the raid, launched by then-US President Harry Truman at the close of World War II, but use the historic visit to underline the dangers of warfare and the need to work towards peace.

Singapore Mental Health Conference to begin today


A nurse helping an elderly patient at the Institute of Mental Health (IMH). PHOTO: ST FILE

The Singapore Mental Health Conference, which starts today and ends on Saturday, will focus on topics about supporting people dealing with mental health issues in the family, community and workplace.

It will also showcase collaborative efforts – by different sectors – that provide more inclusive and integrated care.

US final Q1 growth figures to be released


People walk outside of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on May 16, 2016 in New York. PHOTO: AFP

Investors will be closely watching the final first quarter growth numbers for the United States economy to be released today (May 27).

Flash figures put growth at 0.5 per cent below the 0.7 per cent pace expected earlier, but any improvement could further stiffen the resolve of the US Federal Reserve to raise rates when it next meets in June.