Morning Minutes: What will make headlines, March 23, 2016

Raffles Institution students walk pass a portrait of the late Mr Lee Kuan Yew at the school's atrium before assembly on March 22, 2016.
Raffles Institution students walk pass a portrait of the late Mr Lee Kuan Yew at the school's atrium before assembly on March 22, 2016.ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG

Good morning! Morning Minutes is a round-up of stories that will break on Wednesday, March 23, and which we think you'd be interested in.

It appears on weekdays, available by 7am.

The first anniversary of the death of Lee Kuan Yew

Today (March 23) marks the first anniversary of the death of Singapore's founding prime minister Lee Kuan Yew, and several events have been organised across the country.

From community planting in the heartlands and an early morning walk to trace his life and ideals to prayer services by various religious groups and an academic forum that discusses his enduring ideas, Singaporeans from all walks of life will gather to pay tribute to the man who spent his life building up modern Singapore.

CPI for last month: Inflation expected to remain tame


The logo of the Monetary Authority of Singapore. PHOTO: REUTERS

Singapore will report today (March 23) the consumer price index (CPI) for last month, with inflation expected to remain tame.

Singapore had its 15th straight month of negative inflation in January – the longest spell of sliding prices in almost four decades. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) last month cut its inflation forecast for the year.

Thailand's central bank to leave its policy rate at 1.5 per cent


The headquarters of the Bank of Thailand in central Bangkok, Thailand. PHOTO: REUTERS

Thailand's central bank is expected to leave its already-low policy rate at 1.5 per cent today (March 23), at the same level where it has been for nearly a year.

The Bank of Thailand has leeway to keep rates low as consumer prices have fallen for more than a year. South-east Asia's second-largest economy has yet to get back on a firm recovery track since the army took power in May 2014 to end months of political unrest.

In a bid to lift activity, the junta introduced economic measures and stepped up infrastructure projects. It plans more stimulus, including home loans for low income earners, a tax break and cash handouts to boost spending.