Morning Minutes: What will make headlines, Jan 12, 2016

Minister for Finance Heng Swee Keat speaking at the Singapore Business Federation's Leadership Conference on Nov 4, 2015.
Minister for Finance Heng Swee Keat speaking at the Singapore Business Federation's Leadership Conference on Nov 4, 2015. PHOTO: SBF

Good morning! Morning Minutes is a round-up of stories that will break on Tuesday, Jan 12, and which we think you'd be interested in.

It appears on weekdays, available by 7am.

FINANCE MINISTER AT UBS FORUM

Finance Minister Heng Swee Keat will participate in a dialogue today (Jan 12) with Mr Edmund Koh, head of UBS Wealth Management Asia-Pacific.

Mr Koh will also be delivering the welcome address at the bank's client forum on investment trends, economic outlook and opportunities for 2016.

STUDY ON STROKE AND DEPRESSION

The Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore will reveal findings from a study of more than 170 stroke survivors and their caregivers. Their research is the first in Singapore to look at the relationship between depressive symptoms in stroke survivors and their family caregivers over time. Depressive symptoms include feeling lonely, talking less and having trouble focusing on routine activities. SHERYL LEE 

POLITICAL DIALOGUE IN MYANMAR BEGINS


 Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi delivers a speech in Yangon on Jan 4, 2016. PHOTO: AFP

A five-day peace conference between Myanmar's government and ethnic rebel groups will open today (Jan 12) in the capital Naypyitaw as a follow-up to a ceasefire accord signed last October.

The various parties will seek to lay out a roadmap for negotiations on a federal system for the diverse, multi-ethnic country which has been afflicted with on-off civil wars since its independence in 1948.

Ms Aung San Suu Kyi - whose National League for Democracy (NLD) will form a government in March after winning general elections in November - will make an opening speech. But the absence of at least eight groups including the United Wa State Army (UWSA) and the National Democratic Alliance Army (NDAA), which together have thousands of troops and run de facto states in northern Myanmar, underlines the formidable challenges ahead in forging a wider peace. - NIRMAL GHOSH