Worker dies after crane collapses at Mandalay Road worksite

A stop-work order has been issued to the Mandalay Road site (left), which is part of the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine campus, scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of this year.
A stop-work order has been issued to the Mandalay Road site (left), which is part of the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine campus, scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of this year.PHOTO: LIANHE ZAOBAO

Another is hospitalised; MOM finds serious safety lapses at Mandalay Road worksite

A 25-year-old construction worker died after a crane he was operating collapsed at a Mandalay Road worksite yesterday.

A 57-year-old worker who was on the ground floor was taken to Tan Tock Seng Hospital for treatment after his leg was hit by fallen debris.

Preliminary findings by the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) showed "several serious safety lapses at the worksite", such as openings that had not been properly barricaded, unsafe scaffolding, poorly maintained lifting gears and dangerous access to work areas.

A stop-work order has been issued to the site, which is part of the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine campus, scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of this year.

The infractions must be rectified before Greatearth Construction is allowed to resume work, an MOM spokesman said.

Police received a call for help at 11.20am.

Paramedics arrived at the scene and declared the 25-year-old man dead.

The Straits Times understands that the injured worker is still in hospital under observation. Police are investigating.

Last month, nine people died at their workplace, prompting the MOM to start a four-week safety enforcement operation.

Minister of State (Manpower) Teo Ser Luck yesterday urged firms, especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), to step up their safety efforts.

Speaking at the annual BizSafe convention held at Singapore Expo, Mr Teo said SMEs are "often reluctant to make changes to their day-to-day operations".

"They find it overwhelming to change existing methods and put new systems in place," he added. "Even when (firms) know it is important, the sense of urgency is lacking."

Mr Teo also said that "injuries at work are simply not acceptable" and the deaths "could have been prevented if proper risk management and adequate control measures had been put in place".

"Employers and employees have to work together," he said.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 18, 2016, with the headline 'Worker dies after crane collapses'. Print Edition | Subscribe