$30,000 raised for family of dead maid

The dead maid's brother, Mr Pau Sian Mung, says he was "extremely grateful for the kindness and love" shown by Singaporeans, the welfare organisations and churches. Housewife Prema Naraynasamy and her daughter Gaiyathiri Murugayan are suspected of ki
The dead maid's brother, Mr Pau Sian Mung, says he was "extremely grateful for the kindness and love" shown by Singaporeans, the welfare organisations and churches. Housewife Prema Naraynasamy and her daughter Gaiyathiri Murugayan are suspected of killing Ms Piang at a ninth-floor flat in Block 145, Bishan Street 11, on July 26.ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

Money will be set aside for educational needs of victim's son, says her brother

About $30,000 has been raised for the family of dead Myanmar maid Piang Ngaih Don, 24.

Her brother, Mr Pau Sian Mung, who collected her body from the mortuary yesterday, told The Straits Times he will save it for her three-year-old son's future needs.

Mr Pau, 32, arrived in Singapore on Wednesday last week.

Housewife Prema Naraynasamy, 58, and Gaiyathiri Murugayan, 36, are suspected of killing Ms Piang at a ninth-floor flat in Block 145, Bishan Street 11.

It is not known how she died, although her brother said he was told she died of oxygen deprivation to the brain on July 26. He added that her death certificate said she had suffered a "severe blunt trauma to the neck".

 
 
 

Gaiyathiri's police officer husband Kevin Chelvam, 37, has also been accused of maid abuse and removing evidence that could incriminate the suspects.

Mr Pau said he was distraught when he saw his sister's body. He spoke to The Straits Times briefly at the office of an undertaker in Toa Payoh Lorong 8.

The Straits Times understands that the Myanmar Embassy is working with the authorities in Myanmar to ensure the safekeeping of funds for the educational needs of the victim's son, an only child.

Mr Pau, who volunteers at a Catholic church in his hometown, Dimpi Village in Tedim Township, in the impoverished Chin state, described his late sister as "very quiet". Speaking through a translator, he said: "She never complained about her employers. She only said she would work hard, save money and return to the village."

Their parents died within a year of each other when Ms Piang was just four years old. Her child's father left her when she was pregnant.

Ms Piang arrived in Singapore in May last year. Her brother plans to bury her next to their parents.

He said he was "extremely grateful for the kindness and love" shown by Singaporeans, the welfare organisations and churches.

Dealing with his sister's death has not been easy, he added.

Mr Pau said he would tell his nephew how his mother died when he is old enough. "I'm recording everything he needs to know about his mum. I will teach her son to forgive and to be kind to others, and not to repay evil with evil."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 13, 2016, with the headline '$30,000 raised for family of dead maid'. Print Edition | Subscribe