Living displays trace city's growth

The terrariums are 2m long and 0.6m high (above), and one of them is decorated with more than 15 species of rare orchids (right).
The terrariums are 2m long and 0.6m high (above), and one of them is decorated with more than 15 species of rare orchids. ST PHOTOS: NEO XIAOBIN
The terrariums are 2m long and 0.6m high (above), and one of them is decorated with more than 15 species of rare orchids (right).
The terrariums are 2m long and 0.6m high, and one of them is decorated with more than 15 species of rare orchids (above).

Two terrariums showcasing how Singapore has evolved into a "city in a garden" will be on display at Gardens by the Bay today.

They are part of the ongoing Future of Us exhibition, which envisions what daily life in Singapore will be like in the years to come.

Contributed by the National Parks Board (NParks), the displays measure 2m long, 1.2m wide and 0.6m high, and use more than 45 species of terrestrial and aquatic plants to create tiered landscapes that show the nation's past, present and future.

One aims to capture the evolution of Singapore's cityscape and living environment. It features old kampungs and swamps, present-day residential buildings, such as The Pinnacle@Duxton, and acrylic cut-outs of futuristic buildings. Some 30 species of terrestrial and aquatic plants were used in its creation, many of which are rare and native to forests here.

The other focuses on Singapore's urban and work environment, and features old buildings such as shophouses as well as iconic landmarks such as Gardens by the Bay and the Singapore Flyer. More than 15 species of rare orchids were used in its creation.

The terrariums are part of a new exhibition that will accompany this month's SGfuture dialogue series, titled " A Cleaner, Greener and Smarter Home". The government-led series, which kicks off on Thursday, aims to gather ideas on how Singaporeans can play a bigger role in creating a more liveable and sustainable future.

The free exhibition will be on display from today until Jan 31 at the Marketplace at Gardens by the Bay.


Tiffany Fumiko Tay

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 04, 2016, with the headline 'Living displays trace city's growth'. Print Edition | Subscribe