Bidadari in a different light

A jogger is dwarfed by towering Ficus Benjamina trees at the former Bidadari Cemetery.
A jogger is dwarfed by towering Ficus Benjamina trees at the former Bidadari Cemetery.PHOTO: ST FILE
A memorial dedicated to Koona Vayloo Pillay, the father of Pakirisamy Pillay who developed the Sri Krishnan Temple at Waterloo Street, is a highlight in the Bidadari Garden.
A memorial dedicated to Koona Vayloo Pillay, the father of Pakirisamy Pillay who developed the Sri Krishnan Temple at Waterloo Street, is a highlight in the Bidadari Garden.PHOTO: ST FILE
Mount Vernon Crematorium opened in 1962 and was the first public facility of its kind.
Mount Vernon Crematorium opened in 1962 and was the first public facility of its kind.PHOTO: ST FILE
The ornate details of an iron gate is seen as it opens to Bidadari Garden, a memorial garden preserving the tombstones of prominent pioneers.
The ornate details of an iron gate is seen as it opens to Bidadari Garden, a memorial garden preserving the tombstones of prominent pioneers.PHOTO: ST FILE
Mr S.K. Foo, 75, a retiree, practising taiji under a Ficus Religiosa, commonly known as the Bodhi tree at Bidadari.
Mr S.K. Foo, 75, a retiree, practising taiji under a Ficus Religiosa, commonly known as the Bodhi tree at Bidadari.PHOTO: ST FILE

ONCE a cemetery, currently a recreation area and green space, the 93ha comprising the new Bidadari estate is expected to accommodate 11,000 residential units in the near future.

After exhumation was completed in stages between 2001 and 2004, the graveyard became a favourite haunt of joggers looking to train on its rolling terrain and in its green tranquillity.

With the first Housing Board Build-To-Order flats to be launched by 2015, and expected to be completed in 2018, the landscape will stay the way it is now for a little longer.

The natural beauty, the heritage and the spirit of the place were captured - in a different light - using a specially modified infrared digital single-lens reflex camera.

(Infrared light is invisible to the human eye but can be felt as heat. In black-and-white infrared photography, light wavelengths between 700 and 900 nanometres, invisible to the human eye, are captured. As foliage and vegetation tend to reflect infrared light, these appear white and blue skies appear black, resulting in landscape photographs with a surreal, dreamlike effect.)