Home-grown technologies showcased at major American festival

A service that destroys secret digital documents after they are read, and a virtual touchscreen projected on a wall were some Singaporean technologies showcased this week at a prestigious American festival.

Eight Singapore technology companies were in Austin, Texas, for South By Southwest, one of the biggest interactive, music and film festivals in the United States. The delegation was led by the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA).

The festival ran from Sunday to Wednesday.

Besides security and touchscreen wizardry, the Singapore firms also pitched mobile and 3-D products to American companies.

The companies offering mobile-related technologies were: Nanoveu, the provider of a screen protector that turns mobile gadgets into glasses-free 3-D screens; Touch Jet, the maker of a pocket-sized projector that can create a virtual touch screen on a wall; and Zensorium, which has a heart-rate monitoring device for mobile gadgets.

The other five firms were: Affluential, providing a tool to help companies seek feedback from affluent consumers; Digify, that created the self-destructing document service; Eco, a firm whose service helps companies consolidate customer feedback; Gushcloud, which has an online service that rewards consumers for interacting with advertisements; and RecordTV, whose online service allows users to record free-to-air TV programmes.

At the festival, IDA and its investment arm, Infocomm Investments, also explored potential opportunities with American start-ups to expand in Asia through Singapore, as well as possible partnerships in which American technology-related companies work with Singapore start-ups under IDA's accelerator programme announced on Monday.

The accelerator programme grooms promising technology start-ups here by having a network of successful entrepreneurs and investors to mentor them. The goal is to help better position these start-ups to secure funding in the future.

Register here to get free digital access to The Straits Times until Aug 9, 2015.
Comments