New mobile app launched to help patients track blood pressure readings

Parliamentary Secretary for Education and Social and Family Development Faishal Ibrahim speaking at the Singapore Heart Foundation's World Heart Day 2016 on Oct 1, 2016.
Parliamentary Secretary for Education and Social and Family Development Faishal Ibrahim speaking at the Singapore Heart Foundation's World Heart Day 2016 on Oct 1, 2016.PHOTO: BERITA HARIAN

SINGAPORE - Measuring one's blood pressure is important, and so is monitoring and tracking it. A new mobile app to help people do this easily at home was launched on Saturday (Oct 1), at an event to mark World Heart Day which fell on Sept 29.

The BP Matters app also displays charts to track blood pressure patterns over time, and users can e-mail their records to doctors. The app was developed by the Singapore Heart Foundation, together with Nanyang Polytechnic.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, affects one in four Singaporeans. Last year, cardiovascular disease also accounted for nearly one in three deaths here.

Parliamentary Secretary for Education and Social and Family Development Faishal Ibrahim said: "The numbers may seem bleak, but the good news is that much of cardiovascular disease can be prevented by making just a few simple daily changes - such as getting more exercise and measuring your blood pressure levels regularly." He was guest of honour at the event, held near Yishun MRT station.

Dr Tan Yong Seng, vice-chairman of the Singapore Heart Foundation, said that monitoring and maintaining good blood pressure readings is important for patients because high blood pressure typically does not exhibit any symptoms. "With the BP Matters app, doctors can better determine if treatments are working and (this) helps eliminate any false reading taken one-time at the clinic."

The app can be downloaded for free on the Google Play store. It will also be available on the Apple App Store in November.

The annual World Heart Day is celebrated to increase public awareness and promote preventive measures for cardiovascular risk factors.