Golf clubs: Singapore Island Country Club originally set to lose two courses

Singapore Island Country Club (SICC) was originally meant to lose two of its four 18-hole courses after the leases ran out in 2021, as part of moves by the Government to take back golf course land for more essential needs. -- ST FILE PHOTO: CHEW SENG
Singapore Island Country Club (SICC) was originally meant to lose two of its four 18-hole courses after the leases ran out in 2021, as part of moves by the Government to take back golf course land for more essential needs. -- ST FILE PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM

Singapore Island Country Club (SICC) was originally meant to lose two of its four 18-hole courses after the leases ran out in 2021, as part of moves by the Government to take back golf course land for more essential needs.

In January 2013, the Government said that it was reviewing lease renewals for golf clubs. Details of the affected clubs were released last Sunday.

Among them was SICC, which will lose one of its courses at the Bukit location when the lease runs out of 2021. The course will be converted into a public course and be operated by the labour movement. The other course at the club's Bukit location will have its lease extended till 2030, subject to terms and conditions.

This eventual outcome is more favourable than what was earlier discussed, it turns out, according to club president Tay Joo Soon, who wrote to the club's members in a six-page message on Wednesday.

During closed-door meetings between the club's general committee and the Ministry of Law in December last year, the possibility of the club losing two of its four courses after the leases run out in 2021 was mooted.

However, Mr Tay, said in the newsletter: "We had at all times impressed upon (the ministry) to consider extending our lease, citing various extenuating factors, stressing our heritage and our unusually large membership."

He added: "The general committee and I strongly felt that it is virtually impossible to accommodate more than 7,800 principal members and 18,000 extended membership (holders) in one location after 2021."

He said the concession would give the club more time and greater flexibility to make and executive investment and development plans to facilitate eventual transition.

In the newsletter, Mr Tay acknowledged that the Bukit location may be at greater risk of having some parts of its land rezoned for other developments. He also said that he and the club's general committee were "naturally disappointed" at the outcome, as it would put a strain on the club's facilities.

The club will schedule a members' dialogue session to update members on matters discussed and to decide on work that needs to be done.

Comments