Globe trotters: Four adventurers who walked around the world

Two French men, Killian Blais (with hat), 31 and William Kohler, 31, tucking in local food at Maxwell Road Food Centre on Dec 1, 2014. -- ST PHOTO: LIM SIN THAI
Two French men, Killian Blais (with hat), 31 and William Kohler, 31, tucking in local food at Maxwell Road Food Centre on Dec 1, 2014. -- ST PHOTO: LIM SIN THAI

SINGAPORE - Frenchmen Killian Blais and William Kohler, both 31, are taking globe-trotting to a whole new level by walking around the world. Singapore was the latest stop on their world tour, which Mr Blais started six years ago. He hopes to complete his journey in the next three years. Here are some other intrepid travellers:

1. Ffyona Campbell

Scottish long-distance walker Ffyona Campbell left home at age 16 to cross the globe. She walked 32,000km in 11 years, including a gruelling 30 months across Africa, and raised £180,000 ($370,000) for charity. Ms Campbell set the record then for being the first woman to walk around the world, but admitted in 1996 that she had cheated, skipping 1,600 km of her walk across the United States, and taking a ride in a support truck instead. She started her walk from the village of John O'Groats in Scotland in 1983, returning in 1994.

2. The Goliath Expedition

British ex-paratrooper Karl Bushby, 45, left Punta Arenas, Chile in 1998, planning to walk an unbroken 58,000 km line back to his home in Hull, England. His 15-year journey hit numerous snags due to visa restrictions from Russia, which banned him from re-entering it for five years last March. This means he cannot resume his walk till 2018. He is now in the US attempting to get a new visa from the Russian embassy there. 

3. The World Wide Walk for Peace and Children

Jean Beliveau, 59, a Canadian neon sign manufacturer, left his wife and two children in the city of Montreal in 2000, wheeling a converted baby stroller that carried his supplies. He walked 75,000 km in 11 years to promote peace for children worldwide, and was reunited with his family in 2011, after passing through 64 countries.

4. The Out of Eden Walk

Paul Salopek, 52, two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American reporter, is now more than one year into a seven-year project to walk 33,800 km to retrace the global migration of mankind's ancestors for the National Geographic magazine. He started last January in the Ethiopian Rift Valley, where early man is thought to have lived, and is now at Argil, Turkey. He hopes to finish his trek at Tierra del Fuego at the bottom of South America.