Founder of foreign workers' advocacy group Home still unconscious after stroke

Ms Bridget Tan, founder and chief executive of Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (Home), a foreign workers' advocacy group, has not regained consciousness after suffering a stroke on Tuesday. -- ST FILE PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
Ms Bridget Tan, founder and chief executive of Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (Home), a foreign workers' advocacy group, has not regained consciousness after suffering a stroke on Tuesday. -- ST FILE PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

THE founder and chief executive of Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (Home), a foreign workers' advocacy group, has not regained consciousness after suffering a stroke on Tuesday.

Ms Bridget Tan, 65, was taken to Changi General Hospital after collapsing in her home. She suffers from diabetes and high blood pressure.

Home said in a statement to the media on Thursday that Ms Tan underwent a surgery on Tuesday evening and is "currently recovering from the procedure". She is in intensive care.

The group said that Ms Tan's duties as chief executive will be performed by Home's staff in the meantime.

However, social worker Jolovan Wham, who is a close friend of Ms Tan, told The Straits Times that the group's board of management may consider appointing an acting CEO.

He added: "The board will be meeting later this weekend and they will be discuss how to manage the situation.'

The group added that it remains committed to Ms Tan's vision and its services and operations will continue to run as usual. These include its shelter, hotline, help desks, training and health programmes for migrant workers.

Ms Tan, a former human resource executive, founded Home in 2004 and served as its president for eight years without pay. In October 2012, she assumed the role of CEO - a new full-time, paid position - and took charge of the day-to-day running of the group.

Ms Tan had said then that this would allow the new Home president, who focuses on the group's policies and direction, to remain a volunteer while holding down a full-time job outside.

Each year, Home helps more than 10,000 migrant workers through its shelters, help desks, helplines and educational programmes

Home asked that members of the public respect Ms Tan and her family's privacy.

Comments