Films inspired by real-life student stories, Love Exists and I Believe, a hit

Love Exists (left) and I Believe are part of the 20 films produced for 20/20 - The Temasek Short Film Project. The two films have been gaining traction online with the former viewed 37,000 times, and the latter 76,000 times.
Love Exists and I Believe are part of the 20 films produced for 20/20 - The Temasek Short Film Project. The two films have been gaining traction online with the former viewed 37,000 times, and the latter 76,000 times.PHOTOS: YOUTUBE
Love Exists (left) and I Believe are part of the 20 films produced for 20/20 - The Temasek Short Film Project. The two films have been gaining traction online with the former viewed 37,000 times, and the latter 76,000 times.
Love Exists (above) and I Believe are part of the 20 films produced for 20/20 - The Temasek Short Film Project. The two films have been gaining traction online with the former viewed 37,000 times, and the latter 76,000 times.PHOTOS: YOUTUBE

Love Exists and I Believe are among 20 films scripted and directed by students

A girl cuts her hair short and fights with schoolmates who call her a jinx, as she struggles to cope after her parents die in a car accident.

A youth with autism tries to make friends after joining a church group, asking for people's birthdays and phone numbers when meeting them for the first time.

These are scenes from two videos - Love Exists and I Believe respectively - which have been gaining traction online.

Love Exists has been viewed more than 37,000 times since its release two weeks ago, while I Believe, which features Ah Boys To Men actor Maxi Lim, has been viewed more than 76,000 times since its release three weeks ago.

They are among 20 short films produced for 20/20 - The Temasek Short Film Project which has been commissioned by investment company Temasek.

The films cover a wide range of social issues, including dementia and drug addictions.

They are inspired by or based on real-life stories of the filming crew, work done by Temasek's non-profit philanthropic organisations, and community programmes supported by Temasek.

The films have all been conceptualised, scripted and directed by students. They were picked after being given a list of beneficiaries' stories and pitching their story ideas to a panel of judges.

They also had the opportunity to be mentored by prominent local film-makers, including Boo Junfeng and Wee Li Lin.

Temasek's managing director for strategic and public affairs Stephen Forshaw told The Sunday Times: "We were inspired to put together this project to give young local film-makers the opportunity to develop their talents under the tutorship of experienced mentors.

"During the selection phase, we were delighted at how passionate the student film-makers were about the subjects and beneficiaries they had chosen."

Mr Leroy Lim, 24, the director of I Believe, said it was "meaningful" that the films focus on social issues.

"We all wanted to effect some positive change on society, rather than make a film for the sake of making a film or just for fun," said the student from Lasalle College of the Arts.

Community partners said the films have helped to shine a spotlight on social issues.

Ms Lynn Soh, a principal psychologist at KK Women's and Children's Hospital, said: "These young film-makers have poured their hearts into making short films that tug at the heartstrings of audiences while raising awareness about social issues.

"The film Love Exists is a poignant portrayal of the need for programmes such as the Temasek Cares KITS (Kids in Tough Situations) programme that KKH has."

While the project is not a competition for the 20 teams, viewers can take part in a contest.

Every Friday between May 20 and June 17, four short films are being released. Viewers can vote for their favourite each week to stand a chance to win GoPro cameras.

•To watch the films or enter the contest, go to www.project20twenty.sg

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on June 05, 2016, with the headline 'Films inspired by real-life stories a hit'. Print Edition | Subscribe