Fans turn up at bazaar to meet ST writers

ST associate news editor Abdul Hafiz Abdul Samad signing copies of his book, Guilty As Charged: 25 Crimes That Have Shaken Singapore Since 1965, at SPH's Colour My Palette bazaar yesterday. Pre-school teacher Tay Chay Yim was first in line to get her
Pre-school teacher Tay Chay Yim was first in line to get her copy of Mr Ignatius Low's book Life Is A Mixtape autographed.ST PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG
ST associate news editor Abdul Hafiz Abdul Samad signing copies of his book, Guilty As Charged: 25 Crimes That Have Shaken Singapore Since 1965, at SPH's Colour My Palette bazaar yesterday. Pre-school teacher Tay Chay Yim was first in line to get her
ST associate news editor Abdul Hafiz Abdul Samad signing copies of his book, Guilty As Charged: 25 Crimes That Have Shaken Singapore Since 1965, at SPH's Colour My Palette bazaar yesterday.ST PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG

When pre-school teacher Tay Chay Yim found out that Sunday Times columnist Ignatius Low would be meeting readers yesterday, she knew she had to be there.

Ms Tay, 61, who began reading The Straits Times when she was in secondary school, said: "I have read the more serious and personal writings, but I prefer the columns about his personal life.

"I especially enjoyed the one he wrote on the disappearing Funan mall."

Ms Tay was first in line to have her copy of Mr Low's new book autographed.

Titled Life Is A Mixtape, the book is a collection of more than 70 of Mr Low's best columns in the last decade.

They paint a picture of him as a boy growing up in the 1980s.

He joined the paper in 1999 as a finance correspondent, and wrote his first column seven years later.

Said Mr Low: "For readers who have followed my columns over the years, I guess my book represents my memories of growing up, of old buildings and my observations of the city changing.

"They would know that I'm a sucker for heritage."

Mr Low, who is now head of media solutions at Singapore Press Holdings' (SPH) integrated marketing division, left ST last year.

Readers also met other writers from the national broadsheet at the event, held at Plaza Singapura's front plaza.

Among them was ST associate news editor Abdul Hafiz Abdul Samad and ST Life entertainment editor Andy Chen.

Mr Hafiz's anthology - Guilty As Charged: 25 Crimes That Have Shaken Singapore Since 1965 - looks back at the crimes that left a mark in history.

Mr Chen's book The Swing Of Things is a children's tale featuring illustrations by professional artist Ye Ruoshi.

Last Saturday, readers got to meet four other writers - ST executive editor Sumiko Tan, Life editor Tan Hsueh Yun, assistant sports editor Rohit Brijnath and SPH radio host Shan Wee.

Yesterday's session was the last day of SPH's Colour My Palette, a bazaar with 40 stalls featuring artisan foods, merchandise and craft workshops.

Student Lee Ming Jie, 20, who was at the bazaar, said: "It's like a mini-festival featuring some very delicious-looking street food.

"I love it."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 21, 2017, with the headline 'Fans turn up at bazaar to meet ST writers'. Print Edition | Subscribe