Raise your hand if you use cloth diapers for your kids

Participants holding up cloth diapers before The Great Cloth Diaper Change in Bukit Batok yesterday. Parents said cloth diapers are environmentally friendly and cost effective. The event coincided with Earth Day, which is observed on April 22 to cele
Participants holding up cloth diapers before The Great Cloth Diaper Change in Bukit Batok yesterday. Parents said cloth diapers are environmentally friendly and cost effective. The event coincided with Earth Day, which is observed on April 22 to celebrate life on earth.ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG

Earth Day celebrations include promoting cloth diapers and bio-digesters, tree planting and a food donation drive

Spirits were high in Bukit Batok Zone 2 Residential Committee's office yesterday morning.

This despite more than 60 adults and children squeezing into a room about the size of two HDB living rooms.Parents waved clean cloth diapers in the air, with toddlers on their laps or babies fidgeting on colourful mats.

At 11am, the children's diapers were changed simultaneously before their parents carried them Lion King-style for a photo.

Some 36 families were gathered for an event called The Great Cloth Diaper Change (GCDC).

Originating from the United States, this is the second year GCDC has been organised in Singapore.

This year, the date coincided with Earth Day, observed on April 22 to celebrate life on earth.

Parents told The Sunday Times that cloth diapers are environmentally friendly and cost effective.

Implementation analyst Michelle Yeo, 35, uses cloth diapers for both her daughters, who are three years old and seven months old.

Although she uses disposable liners on the diapers, they are made of environmentally friendly materials as well. "For my older daughter alone, I've saved more than $1,000 already," she said.

Events around the rest of Singapore also focused on reducing waste. In Nee Soon, some 200 residents were advised to say "no" to plastic bags.

In Punggol, Minister for the Environment and Water Resources Masagos Zulkifli launched two projects.

The first involved bio-digesters - which convert food waste into fertiliser - being placed in schools, coffee shops and supermarkets. Schools reported a 20 per cent reduction of food waste due to higher awareness.

The second project hopes to reduce food waste by providing boxes for residents to donate their unwanted food.

The food is then distributed to needy residents.

Kranji Countryside Association (KCA) commemorated Earth Day by planting 22 Kranji trees on nine member farms' premises.

KCA president Kenny Eng said the Kranji tree population has declined due to urbanisation and was not preserved in the area named after it. "The significance is also in the heritage of Kranji," he said, citing the war memorial park.

"We want to bring back what was native to this area."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on April 23, 2017, with the headline 'Raise your hand if you use cloth diapers for your kids'. Print Edition | Subscribe