No hot spots detected, low chance of transboundary haze in coming days, says NEA

Haze seen from Block 333. Bishan Street, at 7.10am on April 21, 2017.
Haze seen from Block 333. Bishan Street, at 7.10am on April 21, 2017. ST PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG
Haze at  Bedok South Avenue 2 at about 7am on April 21, 2017.
Haze at Bedok South Avenue 2 at about 7am on April 21, 2017.ST PHOTO: JACQUELINE CHANG
Haze at Pandan Canal near Sunset way at about 7am on April 21, 2017.
Haze at Pandan Canal near Sunset way at about 7am on April 21, 2017. ST PHOTO: JOYCE FANG
Haze seen from Block 333. Bishan Street, at 7.10am on April 21, 2017.
Haze seen from Block 333. Bishan Street, at 7.10am on April 21, 2017. ST PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG

SINGAPORE - A Sumatra squall on Friday (April 21) morning has helped to clear hazy conditions in Singapore, the National Environment Agency (NEA) said. 

The 24-hour Pollutant Standards Index (PSI) had been at the high end of the moderate range on Friday, reaching 95 in the south at 8am. 

At 2pm, it was highest in the south of the island at 89. A PSI reading above 100 indicates unhealthy air quality, while a reading of 51 to 100 means moderate air quality. 

In the east, it reached 83, and in the north, 80. It was 59 in the west and 77 in the central region.

In a late morning update on Friday, NEA said that there were no significant hot spots or smoke haze detected in the nearby region.

"The haziness was due to the accumulation of particulate matter under light wind conditions," it said.

The likelihood of transboundary haze affecting Singapore in the coming days is low, the agency told The Straits Times.

The rest of Friday is expected to be cloudy with light rain clearing in the afternoon.

Asia Pulp & Paper Company said there are currently no fires in their supply chain and they are continuing to actively monitor the situation in and around their suppliers' concession borders.

 

The one-hour PM2.5 reading was between three and eight, which is normal (Band I).

Band I, ranging from 0 to 55, is normal while Band II (56 to 150) is elevated. 

The PM2.5 concentration readings are an indicative measure of the current air quality and can be used to plan one's immediate activities.

Most people can continue their normal activities while the 24-hour PSI is moderate, according to NEA website.