Get to know the new Springleaf Nature Park that opened on Nov 1

The Springleaf Nature Park, the first of four new nature parks around the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, was officially opened on Saturday. -- ST PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM
The Springleaf Nature Park, the first of four new nature parks around the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, was officially opened on Saturday. -- ST PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM
The Common Flameback  woodpecker has a golden-brown back and wings, and an orange-red rump. It feeds on ants, termites and other insects on the bark of large trees. It is usually seen in pairs, often calling with loud, short rattles in flight. -
The Common Flameback  woodpecker has a golden-brown back and wings, and an orange-red rump. It feeds on ants, termites and other insects on the bark of large trees. It is usually seen in pairs, often calling with loud, short rattles in flight. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Yellow-bellied Prinia stays within the long grass, hops from one grass stalk to another and frequently stands at the end of the tall stalks looking around or singing. It is also found at the back mangrove, roadside scrub and agricultural farmland
The Yellow-bellied Prinia stays within the long grass, hops from one grass stalk to another and frequently stands at the end of the tall stalks looking around or singing. It is also found at the back mangrove, roadside scrub and agricultural farmland. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Yellow-Vented Bulbul has a slight crest, white face and yellow under tail coverts. It sips nectar, nibbles on young shoots and snacks on insects. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Yellow-Vented Bulbul has a slight crest, white face and yellow under tail coverts. It sips nectar, nibbles on young shoots and snacks on insects. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Blue-tailed Bee-eater has a greenish plumage with a prominent orange-brown throat. This migratory bird usually arrives in August and stays until March. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Blue-tailed Bee-eater has a greenish plumage with a prominent orange-brown throat. This migratory bird usually arrives in August and stays until March. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Singapore Kopsia is a small evergreen tree that grows up to 12m in height. This species is endemic to lowland and freshwater swamp forests of Singapore and Peninsular Malaysia. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Singapore Kopsia is a small evergreen tree that grows up to 12m in height. This species is endemic to lowland and freshwater swamp forests of Singapore and Peninsular Malaysia. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Pear Mangosteen is an evergreen mid-canopy rainforest tree that can grow up to 30m in height. When bruised, all parts of the plant will exude yellowish latex. Its flowers are pollinated by insects and the fruits are eaten by birds and small mamma
The Pear Mangosteen is an evergreen mid-canopy rainforest tree that can grow up to 30m in height. When bruised, all parts of the plant will exude yellowish latex. Its flowers are pollinated by insects and the fruits are eaten by birds and small mammals. It is native to Singapore. -- PHOTO: NPARKS
The Springleaf Nature Park, the first of four new nature parks around the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, was officially opened on Saturday. -- ST PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM
The Springleaf Nature Park, the first of four new nature parks around the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, was officially opened on Saturday. -- ST PHOTO: CHEW SENG KIM

The Springleaf Nature Park, the first of four new nature parks around the Central Catchment Nature Reserve located at Nee Soon Road, Upper Thomson Road, was officially opened on Saturday.

Formerly a kampung known as Chan Chu Kang, the park now includes trails, a rest shelter and an observation deck for bird-watchers. Here are some other interesting facts about the Springleaf Nature Park.


It used to be a kampung

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Named after its headman, Mr Chan Ah Lak, Chan Chu Kang village was located in the ‘kangkar' (Teochew for 'the land around the riverbank') of Seletar River. Mr Chan bought 18 hectares in 1850 and used it to cultivate gambier and pepper.

It also used to be a rubber plantation

In 1912 the land was used to support the growth of the rubber industry in Singapore. The village was subsequently renamed Nee Soon village after Lim Nee Soon, who set up the rubber factory in the 'kangkar'.

It is a bird watcher's dream

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The six-hectare park is home to over 80 species of resident and migratory birds. The park even has an observation deck for bird-watchers to look out for species such as the White-throated Kingfisher, the Yellow-vented Bulbul and the Blue-tailed Bee-eater.

How to get there

Click on image for full map

Located at Nee Soon Road, Upper Thomson Road visitors can take various busses to get to the park. Bus services include, SBS 138, SMRT 167, 169 or 980. Visitors should alight at the bus stop outside the former Nessea Club.

melheng@sph.com.sg