Science Centre and US science museum launch Asia's first Tinkering Studio

Scribble Bot - constructed using a base (made up of everyday items like milk cartons and paper cups), motors, markers and batteries, visitors will be able to create motorised machine that draws lines and circles.
Scribble Bot - constructed using a base (made up of everyday items like milk cartons and paper cups), motors, markers and batteries, visitors will be able to create motorised machine that draws lines and circles. PHOTO: SCIENCE CENTRE SINGAPORE
Assoc Prof and chief executive of SCS Lim Tit Meng (second from left) at the launch of Tinkering Studio, an activity space with hands-on exhibits and activities, in collaboration with The Exploratorium.
Assoc Prof and chief executive of SCS Lim Tit Meng (second from left) at the launch of Tinkering Studio, an activity space with hands-on exhibits and activities, in collaboration with The Exploratorium. PHOTO: SCIENCE CENTRE SINGAPORE

SINGAPORE - The Science Centre Singapore (SCS), in collaboration with San Francisco's science museum, The Exploratorium, launched Asia's first Tinkering Studio on Friday (Jan 22) to encourage creative learning.

Suitable for teachers, students and families, the studio encourages learning through interactive exhibits and activities.

Associate professor and chief executive of SCS, Lim Tit Meng said: "Before the invention of computers, tablets and smartphones, children used to spend hours exploring their surroundings as they dabbled with different materials and immersed themselves in different environments, both indoors and outdoors."

"With the widespread adoption of technology today, computers have become the primary source of information for many. With everything available at the click of a button or the tap of a finger, many no longer feel a need to physically explore the world around them."

Among the activities at the space, young minds can look forward in constructing their own Scribble Bot - a motorized machine with legs.

The base is made from everyday items like milk cartons and paper cups fixed together with motors, markers and batteries. When switched on, it vibrates, bounces, spins and bumps drawing lines and circles.

Deputy president of The Institution of Engineers, Singapore, Edwin Khew said: "It is crucial for the younger generation to have the opportunity to experience the wonders of science and engineering when they are still young."

"The way of learning and the learning curve of the young today are quite different from before and this calls for a change in our ways to effectively engage them."

A memorandum of understanding was on Friday signed between SCS and The Exploratorium to encourage and support the growth of the tinkering movement in the region.

The Science Centre also signed an MOU with the Institution of Engineers Singapore to promote science and engineering among the public through talks, forums, symposia and other forms of outreach events.