New mobile app teaches Malay words through interactive game

Screenshot from mobile game app Pintar Kata. The app is created by the Malay Language Centre of Singapore (MLCS), and launched by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat at the annual Malay Language Seminar on June 4, 2015. -- SCREENSHOT: PINTAR KATA
Screenshot from mobile game app Pintar Kata. The app is created by the Malay Language Centre of Singapore (MLCS), and launched by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat at the annual Malay Language Seminar on June 4, 2015. -- SCREENSHOT: PINTAR KATA
Screenshot from mobile game app Pintar Kata. The app is created by the Malay Language Centre of Singapore (MLCS), and launched by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat at the annual Malay Language Seminar on June 4, 2015. -- SCREENSHOT: PINTAR KATA
Screenshot from mobile game app Pintar Kata. The app is created by the Malay Language Centre of Singapore (MLCS), and launched by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat at the annual Malay Language Seminar on June 4, 2015. -- SCREENSHOT: PINTAR KATA

SINGAPORE - Students can now learn new Malay words while having fun at the same time with a new mobile app.

The Pintar Kata ("Smart in Vocabulary") app is a game that encourages learning vocabulary, and can be downloaded on both iOS and Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play Store respectively.

Players choose an avatar and progress in the game by searching for Malay words in a grid of letters within a certain time. The app also provides the meaning and usage of the words formed.

The app, created by the Malay Language Centre, was launched this morning by Education Minister Heng Swee Keat at the annual Malay Language Seminar.

Mr Heng said that the app was an example of "harnessing technology" in learning mother tongue languages.

"Our different races, including the Malay community, are rich in heritage and cultural treasures. A strong grasp of language is the foundation that empowers people to explore their cultural assets," he added.

This year's seminar was attended by about 400 educators, who discussed best practices in teaching Malay. At the event, 10 schools also exhibited their Malay language teaching and learning resources.

teezhuo@sph.com.sg