Holder with resonance

(From left) Mr Ng Mun Gie, Mr Chang Kwok Chung and Ms Yew Jia Shuen from NYP's School of Health Sciences showing a 3D printed holder for anatomical side markers commonly used by radiographers during an x-ray.
(From left) Mr Ng Mun Gie, Mr Chang Kwok Chung and Ms Yew Jia Shuen from NYP's School of Health Sciences showing a 3D printed holder for anatomical side markers commonly used by radiographers during an x-ray.PHOTO: DON WONG FOR THE STRAITS TIMES

When an X-ray is taken, "L" and "R"-shaped lead markers are placed on the sides of the body they correspond to. These radio-opaque markers help doctors to identify the side of the body they are looking at.

But some NYP radiography students on clinical attachments found it inconvenient to carry the markers around without a holder.

One of them, Mr Erwin Chang, said: "We experience a very high patient load every day. It's easy to get (the markers) misplaced."

So the team of seven students spent some weeks at MakerSpace creating a holder for these radiographic markers.

A beep alert sounds when a marker, magnetically attached to the holder, has been removed from the device for more than 90 seconds. The students have tested the device at Ng Teng Fong General, Tan Tock Seng, Raffles and Khoo Teck Puat hospitals, saying that it was well-received by the radiographers there.

The team used a 3D printer and Dremel tool to fashion the holder's outer case, made from PLA and ABS plastics, and a soldering iron for the electrical components.

Mr Chang, 32, a former field engineer who is on a professional conversion programme, said the holder costs about $10 to produce.

But it is not always about work at MakerSpace; it allows for more light-hearted pursuits too.

"One of our classmates just had a baby," said Mr Chang, "so we went to MakerSpace to make cards for him... using the scrap cloth, wire, and paper cutters there."