Hard work for PSLE pays off

Among the Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund beneficiaries who received cash awards for doing well in the PSLE are Chong How (front row, left) and Dhaniyah Qasimah Zamri Abdullah (front row, second from right). In the back row are HSBC chief exec
Among the Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund beneficiaries who received cash awards for doing well in the PSLE are Chong How (front row, left) and Dhaniyah Qasimah Zamri Abdullah (front row, second from right). In the back row are HSBC chief executive Guy Harvey-Samuel (centre), ST managing editor Fiona Chan and STSPMF board trustee Han Jok Kwang. On the right is the fund's general manager, Ms Tan Bee Heong.ST PHOTO: DESMOND WEE

A rainy day used to spell trouble for Dhaniyah Qasimah Zamri Abdullah, who would have to endure a week in damp shoes because she did not have another pair.

From today, the Bowen Secondary School student will have a pair of dry shoes no matter the weather.

Dhaniyah is one of the 30 beneficiaries of the Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund (STSPMF) who received cash awards from HSBC for doing well in the PSLE.

The 13-year-old, who is a member of the national Under-16 women's football squad, said the $800 award would help relieve her family's financial burden and allow her to buy necessities such as school shoes.

This is the third consecutive year that the fund has recognised students' achievement in the PSLE. They received their awards at a ceremony yesterday at the Treetop Room in the HSBC building.

Chong How, 13, was awarded $1,000 for his PSLE score of 255. He is now enrolled in the NUS High School of Mathematics and Science.

His father, Mr Y. J. Chong, 51, was all smiles as he watched his son deliver a speech.

Speaking in Mandarin, the computer technician said: "I'm very happy for him. This cash award and the pocket money fund will be a great help and we will save it to help pay for his university in the future."

Since its launch in 2000, the STSPMF has sought to provide children from low-income families with pocket money for school-related expenses.

Dhaniyah now has one less worry as she pursues her passion for football. "I can buy one more set of school shoes together with my school uniform... and the balance, I will keep for any international friendly (matches) with the national team," she said.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 21, 2017, with the headline 'Hard work for PSLE pays off'. Print Edition | Subscribe