Doctor guilty of causing cyclist's death through negligence fined $20,000 by SMC

Doctor Teo Tiong Kiat, who was found negligent in a fatal hit-and-run accident, has been fined $20,000 and censured by the Singapore Medical Council (SMC)'s disciplinary tribunal. -- ST FILE PHOTO: TED CHEN
Doctor Teo Tiong Kiat, who was found negligent in a fatal hit-and-run accident, has been fined $20,000 and censured by the Singapore Medical Council (SMC)'s disciplinary tribunal. -- ST FILE PHOTO: TED CHEN

A doctor found negligent in a fatal hit-and-run accident has been fined $20,000 and censured by the Singapore Medical Council (SMC)'s disciplinary tribunal.

Teo Tiong Kiat, 66, also had to pay the expenses incurred in the tribunal's prooceedings, including costs of the lawyers to the SMC, the Council said in a statement on Friday.

In 2010, the General Practitioner was driving along Clementi Road when he hit a cyclist, Mr Mok Chee Kong, 35, causing his death. The accident also caused severe injury to fellow cyclist, Mr Bertram Leong, 24.

Teo, who had had a glass of wine over dinner but passed a breathalyser test, had veered from the centre lane of Clementi Road to the left lane, hitting the cyclists.

In a court hearing in 2012, Teo had admitted to two counts of negligent driving. He pleaded not guilty to three other charges, but was convicted on those counts - that of failing to stop after the accident, failing to give aid, and removing his car from the scene before he was supposed to.

Teo was later jailed for four weeks and banned from driving for five years.

During the SMC disciplinary tribunal hearing on Jan 28 this year, Teo volunteered not to drive again for the rest of his life. In fact, he had voluntarily stopped driving immediately after the accident, he said.

In any case, Teo was made to "give a written undertaking to SMC that he will not apply for a driving license or drive in future".

The tribunal stopped short of suspending the doctor, noting that the offences were "undeniably serious" but "not pre-meditated ones involving fraud, dishonesty or violence, for which suspension if not striking off were clearly warranted".

The tribunal also felt that a "high fine" of $20,000 was sufficient to "restore public confidence" in the medical profession.

Comments