Tuas Checkpoint breach

Three more charges for BMW driver

Dawood allegedly had cakes and pastries weighing about 200kg in his car.
Dawood allegedly had cakes and pastries weighing about 200kg in his car.

He allegedly imported food not registered with AVA and later dumped some of it

A Singaporean businessman who allegedly drove through Tuas Checkpoint - with cakes and pastries weighing about 200 kg - despite being asked to stop for checks was in court yesterday to face three charges. This is in addition to the charge he faced on June 26.

Mohamed Dawood Abdul Sukkur, 47, had earlier been accused of committing a rash act to endanger the safety of others, by allegedly driving a BMW at 142kmh within a confined security checkpoint area with a speed limit of 15kmh.

Yesterday's charges included two which alleged that he imported food that was not registered with the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA).

His car allegedly had 145 packets of traditional cakes and pastries weighing about 200kg, four bottles of maize drink weighing about 1kg, and 105 packets of Ramly beef patties weighing about 37.8kg.

He was also charged with intentionally perverting the course of justice by disposing of the 105 beef patties into a drain along the Pan-Island Expressway (PIE).

If convicted of importing the unregistered pastries, Dawood faces a fine of up to $1,000. Under the Wholesome Meat and Fish Act, it is a jail sentence of up to two years, and a fine of up to $50,000, for importing unlicensed meat patties.

For intentionally perverting the course of justice by disposing of goods, the maximum punishment is seven years' jail and a fine.

The prosecution sought a three-week adjournment for further investigation as he could face more charges from Singapore Customs.

He is out on $10,000 bail and will return to court on Aug 5.

Dawood is represented by lawyer Noor Mohamed Marican.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 15, 2015, with the headline 'Three more charges for BMW driver'. Print Edition | Subscribe