Man jailed for cheating by using fake $100 currency notes to pay for items

Nordin Sirajuddin admitted to one charge of cheating and two of scheming with his 17-year-old brother to cheat.
Nordin Sirajuddin admitted to one charge of cheating and two of scheming with his 17-year-old brother to cheat.PHOTO: ST GRAPHIC

SINGAPORE - A man was jailed for four months on Monday (Oct 26) for cheating and abetting his younger brother to cheat by using fake $100 notes to make purchases.

Nordin Sirajuddin, 22, admitted to one charge of cheating and two of scheming with his 17-year-old brother to cheat by using fake $100 currency notes to pay for various items.

He has made full restitution of $700 involved in all his seven charges, four of which were considered during his sentencing.

A district court heard that some time in September last year, Nordin found a wet and crumpled counterfeit $100 note at the roof garden near his home in Punggol Drive. The note of the "ship'' series had no vertical embedded silver security line.

Nordin, a part-time sales marketer at his family-owned company, then formed the idea that he could counterfeit notes by reprinting images of older series of currency notes since they did not bear the silver security line.

He used a laptop to obtain sample pictures of notes from older series of currency online. Using a colour printer, he printed the images of both sides of the $100 note onto the flipsides of single pieces of paper, cut out the printed image and created seven pieces of false bills.

On Sept 16 last year, he used one fake $100 note to pay for $17 worth of items at a Cheers convenience shop in Punggol Field and got back $83 change.

The court heard that he showed his younger brother, a student at the Institute of Technical Education, a counterfeit note he had created, and his brother commented that it "looked real''.

Both planned and agreed to use fake notes to make purchases. They went to a supermarket in Punggol Drive and got back $85 cash after buying cigarettes and sweets worth $15.

Four days later, they bought cigarettes at a 7-Eleven nearby and got back $88 in cash from the cashier.

On Sept 17, a manager of Cheers called the police emergency hotline to report that a customer had made payment using a forged note the previous evening.

Nordin could have been jailed for up to 10 years and fined on each charge.