Businessman gets 5 months' jail for giving bribes to manager at Nestle


Ron Wong Teck Chye gave bribes totalling $62,071 to an employee of Nestle to further the business interests of his company with Nestle. He was jailed for five months on Friday (July 21).
Ron Wong Teck Chye gave bribes totalling $62,071 to an employee of Nestle to further the business interests of his company with Nestle. He was jailed for five months on Friday (July 21).PHOTO: ST GRAPHICS

SINGAPORE - A man who gave bribes totalling $62,071 to an employee of Nestle to further the business interests of his company with Nestle was jailed for five months on Friday (July 21).

Ron Wong Teck Chye, 35, who owns a courier company, was a director of SCAD Partners when he gave various amounts to Toh Hong Huat on 29 occasions between Jan 7, 2012, and April 27, 2013.

He pleaded guilty to seven charges of corruption. The remaining 22 charges were taken into consideration in his sentencing.

Toh, 35, then a beverage systems solution manager of Nestle, has been dealt with. He was convicted after a trial last year and sentenced to eight months' jail and ordered to pay a penalty of $62,071.

Deputy Public Prosecutor Jasmin Kaur said that sometime in late 2010, Toh approached Wong and said that Nestle was urgently looking for a new contractor to maintain their drink dispenser machines.

Wong was interested in being awarded the contract, and Toh then recommended SCAD, which provides general wholesale trading, to Nestle for the contract, despite the fact that SCAD had no experience in providing such services.

After Nestle awarded the contract to SCAD in early 2011, the two met for a meal. It was agreed that Toh would be given 50 per cent of SCAD's profits.

DPP Kaur said that on Jan 7, 2012, Wong passed a $9,000 cheque to Toh for assisting SCAD to secure the contract with Nestle.

In early February that year, Wong calculated the profits for January to be around $6,000 and estimated the profits to be the same for the rest of the year.

When Wong suggested giving half of that to Toh, Toh proposed that Wong employ his wife, Ms Xia Li, in SCAD, and for the corrupt payments to be paid in the form of monthly salary and Central Provident Fund payments to her.

Toh was then intending to apply for a long-term visit pass for his mother-in-law, and felt that if his wife were gainfully employed, there would be a higher chance of the application being successful. Wong agreed.

Between February 2012 and January 2013, Wong paid Ms Xia a monthly salary of $2,040 and $918 to her CPF account.

But in February 2013, Wong stopped the fictitious employment of Ms Xia and resumed paying $3,000 to Toh after Toh told him that his mother-in-law's application for a long-term visit pass was unsuccessful.

Wong's lawyer Lee Cheong Hoh said that Toh was the one who guided his client, and who did all the legwork. He said Wong "fully regrets" committing the offences, and has fully cooperated with the authorities in the investigation.

Wong could have been fined up to $100,000 and/or jailed for up to five years on each bribery charge.