Changes to law on detention without trial


The Bill aims to set out clearly the scope of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act and clarify the powers of the Home Affairs Minister under the Act.
The Bill aims to set out clearly the scope of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act and clarify the powers of the Home Affairs Minister under the Act. PHOTO: ST FILE

A law that allows detention of criminal suspects without trial will be changed to set out a list of offences under its ambit, including unlicensed moneylending, drug trafficking and organised crime.

The Bill, tabled yesterday in Parliament, aims to set out clearly the scope of the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act and clarify the powers of the Home Affairs Minister under the Act. It will also extend the lifespan of the Act for another five years, starting on Oct 21 next year. Introduced in 1955, the Act lapses after five years unless it is renewed. It has been extended 13 times.

Laws governing charities were also amended yesterday to give the Commissioner of Charities enhanced powers, among other things.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 10, 2018, with the headline 'Changes to law on detention without trial'. Print Edition | Subscribe