PICTURES

Car in Mountbatten: Was it wet cement, or marine clay? Netizens weigh in

A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP
A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement? -- PHOTO: STOMP

A series of photographs showing a car covered in what appeared to be wet cement has some hawk-eyed netizens wondering: Was it actually mud instead of cement?

On Sunday noon, remisier John Toi, 58, witnessed a car completely covered in what looked like wet cement when the tipper truck in front of it braked suddenly and spilled its load on it.

The incident took place at the junction of Mountbatten Road and Stadium Boulevard.

He snapped several photographs of the car and sent them to citizen journalism website Stomp.

A post on the Straits Times' Facebook page has got people wondering what the material could be. Reader Jeffrey Soh, for example, said it looked more like "mud with soil" as he reasoned that a tipper truck could not be transporting cement.

"The cement will dry up in no time (and leak all over while it is still liquid). If I'm not mistaken, cement must be transported using cement mixer trucks with the mixer rotating constantly," he added.

Others conjectured that it was marine clay.

Asked for his view, Dr Ho Nyok Yong, president of the Singapore Contractors Association, said that the offending material might not be cement but soft, clay-like earth.

Traffic Police said it got a call about the incident and that there were no injuries.