Bridget’s Adventures: Toeing the (slack)line

Focus and plenty of concentration is key to get from one anchor point to another on a slackline. Journalist Bridget Tan even attempts a yoga pose midway.
SINGAPORE - One step, then another. And before I knew it, the ground came flying towards my face in a split second.
 
Slacklining is not for slackers.
 
But when my instructor Naufal Muhammad did it, he made it look like a cinch. He jumped, bounced and practically danced on the 50mm wide slackline.
 
When I had a go, the toughest part of the experience was keeping steady. My legs seemed to take on a life of their own, shaking endlessly as I attempted to walk the short distance from tree to tree. 
 
Not to be confused with a tightrope, a slackline is a length of webbing suspended between two anchors. It does not have as much tension, so it aids in balancing. 
 
Slacklining first appeared in Singapore in 2010, and since then, more than 1,000 enthusiasts have practised the sport.
 
Free two-hour sessions are held at *Scape every Thursday at 8pm for beginners to try walking on the slacklines and for experience slackliners to expand their array of tricks.
 
Bridget’s Adventures is a 10-part video series that features Bridget gamely trying out new and challenging activities.