Better prepared

Bigger, better display

The nine-member SAF Parachute Team, known as the Red Lions, returned yesterday after a two-year break. Last year, the Red Lions could not parachute into the National Stadium due to safety reasons, and at the SG50 parade at the Padang in 2015, the jum
The calm of Marina Bay was shattered by a high-speed chase between intruders on jet skis and the navy’s rigid- hulled inflatable boats, as a CH-47 Chinook hovered above. This simulation was part of the Dynamic Defence Display. ST PHOTO: FELINE LIM
The nine-member SAF Parachute Team, known as the Red Lions, returned yesterday after a two-year break. Last year, the Red Lions could not parachute into the National Stadium due to safety reasons, and at the SG50 parade at the Padang in 2015, the jum
Elite officers from the police’s Emergency Response Teams and volunteers attending to “casualties” during the Dynamic Defence Display segment of the parade which highlighted the new threat of terrorism for the first time. ST PHOTO: CHONG JUN LIANG
The nine-member SAF Parachute Team, known as the Red Lions, returned yesterday after a two-year break. Last year, the Red Lions could not parachute into the National Stadium due to safety reasons, and at the SG50 parade at the Padang in 2015, the jum
The nine-member SAF Parachute Team, known as the Red Lions, returned yesterday after a two-year break. Last year, the Red Lions could not parachute into the National Stadium due to safety reasons, and at the SG50 parade at the Padang in 2015, the jump was called off because of poor weather.ST PHOTO: FELINE LIM

SAF's popular defence display makes a much-awaited comeback

After a two-year absence, the crowd-favourite Dynamic Defence Display (D3) returned to the National Day Parade yesterday with a bang.

The audience was in awe during the two-part display, which featured an array of over 50 high-tech assets from the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), the Republic of Singapore Air Force, the Republic of Singapore Navy and the Home Team.

Two 20-tonne Belrex Protected Combat Support Vehicles, two 17.5-tonne Peacekeeper Protected Response Vehicles and a Heron 1 unmanned aerial vehicle were among those making a first appearance at the parade.

The audience was also treated to several simulated sequences, including a high-speed chase sequence by the navy's rigid-hulled inflatable boats and an aerial display by three F-15SG fighter jets.

The Terrex Infantry Carrier Vehicle returned to the NDP stage with three of the vehicles providing fire for troopers in a simulated combat sequence.

Lance Corporal Tan Jun Lin said he would never have imagined he would be driving the Terrex in front of more than 20,000 people. He started serving his national service only last year.

While operating the Terrex is a "big jump" from the smaller Belrex and five-tonner trucks he had previously learnt to drive, Lance Cpl Tan said he had "a lot of preparation and training time" to learn to navigate the 24-tonne vehicle, which requires the use of numerous cameras that are mounted on it.

  • 50 High-tech assets on display from the Singapore Armed Forces, the Republic of Singapore Air Force, the Republic of Singapore Navy and the Home Team.

Lieutenant-Colonel Law Wei Shing, 36, chairman of the management for the D3 committee, said he was excited when he found out that he would be choreographing the D3 segment - one of his favourite parts of the parade - this year.

The display aimed to inspire "the confidence of the people" in Singapore's military forces as the "cornerstone of the sovereignty of the country", said LTC Law, who is the commanding officer of the 30th Battalion, Singapore Combat Engineers.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 10, 2017, with the headline 'Bigger, better display'. Print Edition | Subscribe