Beautiful Science

JunoCam images are not just for art and science - sometimes they are processed to bring about a chuckle. 	This image, processed by citizen scientist Jason Major, is titled "Jovey McJupiterface". By rotating the image 180 degrees and orienting it from
PHOTO: NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/JASON MAJOR

JunoCam images are not just for art and science - sometimes they are processed to bring about a chuckle.     

This image, processed by citizen scientist Jason Major, is titled "Jovey McJupiterface". By rotating the image 180 degrees and orienting it from south up, two white oval storms turn into eyeballs, and the "face" of Jupiter is revealed.     

The original image was acquired by JunoCam on Nasa's Juno spacecraft. In May, the unmanned Nasa spaceship circling Jupiter spotted massive cyclones at the gas giant's poles.  Jupiter's poles are covered with dozens of densely clustered storms, possibly dropping hail or snow, with some of the storms measuring up to 1,400km across.     

A Nasa statement describes the planet as "a complex, gigantic, turbulent world" that is far different from what scientists previously thought.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 07, 2017, with the headline 'Beautiful Science'. Print Edition | Subscribe