Beautiful Science

The 4m-long shark hangs frozen in mid-air, bathed in cold blue light, silently greeting those who walk through the museum's dim corridors. To create the work Don't Copy II, artist Li Jiwei suspended more than 70 pieces of plastic from the ceiling. Th
ST PHOTO: LIM SIN THAI

The 4m-long shark hangs frozen in mid-air, bathed in cold blue light, silently greeting those who walk through the museum's dim corridors.

To create the work Don't Copy II, artist Li Jiwei suspended more than 70 pieces of plastic from the ceiling. The 57-year-old said art may not directly change human greed "but through its interesting, expressive, artistic form, it can attract people's attention and awaken their awareness".

Sharks are killed mainly for fins used in shark's fin soup, a pricey delicacy in many parts of Asia.

The work is one of 33 art pieces on display at Parkview Museum Singapore in North Bridge Road, which opened to the public last week with the exhibition On Sharks And Humanity. The environmentally focused exhibition tackles marine conservation and shark protection through its works.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, up to 73 million sharks are killed globally, putting immense pressure on many species.

Like many large predators, sharks are vulnerable to overfishing because they grow slowly and produce relatively few offspring.

For instance, the great white shark - a much misunderstood species - gives birth to between two and 12 babies after about a year of carrying them.

In contrast, the average atlantic salmon produces about 3,000 to 5,000 eggs at a time.

The free exhibition will run until Sept 9 and is open from 1pm to 7pm daily. For more information, visit http://parkviewmuseum.com/

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 17, 2017, with the headline 'Beautiful Science'. Print Edition | Subscribe