Baby arrives in mad race to get woman to hospital

Medical staff at SGH cut the baby's umbilical cord in the car.
Medical staff at SGH cut the baby's umbilical cord in the car.PHOTO: SYED ZUKARNAIN/FACEBOOK
"What we can do, we just help," said Mr Syed.
"What we can do, we just help," said Mr Syed.PHOTO: SYED ZUKARNAIN/FACEBOOK
The baby girl was born in the car, 15 minutes away from (SGH).
The baby girl was born in the car, 15 minutes away from (SGH).PHOTO: SYED ZUKARNAIN/FACEBOOK
Mr Syed's wife helped support the baby girl, wrapped her in a shawl and brought her as close to her mother as possible.
Mr Syed's wife helped support the baby girl, wrapped her in a shawl and brought her as close to her mother as possible.PHOTO: SYED ZUKARNAIN/FACEBOOK

SINGAPORE - Mr Syed Zukarnain and his wife were giving a lift to a man and his pregnant wife who were heading to the hospital to deliver their baby.

But caught in morning traffic, the baby girl simply couldn't wait - she was born in their car, 15 minutes away from Singapore General Hospital (SGH).

The 46-year-old document controller detailed the experience in a Facebook post on Wednesday.

He told The Straits Times that they were on the way out of a carpark in Bukit Panjang at around 9am when he saw the woman lying at a staircase by the side of the road, in pain.

"I suspected it was labour pains," Mr Syed said.

The couple had been trying to get a taxi for an hour with no success.

" I asked them to get into the car," Mr Syed said.

However, they ran into the morning rush hour traffic. Along Lower Delta Road, the baby's father said that the infant's head was already out, so Mr Syed asked his wife to climb into the back seat to help.

His wife, a 47-year-old admin executive, helped support the baby girl, wrapped her in a shawl and brought her as close to her mother as possible.

Mr Syed's mind was on the road but the situation inside the car was tense as well - the baby didn't cry initially. "I was quite worried. Once my wife carried her, she started crying. I felt relieved."

Fifteen minutes later, they reached SGH, where medical staff cut the umbilical cord in the car.

"(The parents) didn't have words to say. They just said 'thank you so much'.

"I just told them no worries, don't mention it, because as long as the baby and mother are safe, we're happy. What we can do, we just help," Mr Syed said.

He added: "An hour later, I messaged him asking how's the baby and mother. He said they are doing fine."

A post on the selfless act was posted on citizen journalism website Stomp on Wednesday. It had garnered close to 25,000 views.