AVA receives reports of crow attacks at East Coast Road, removes bird and nest

A woman said 11 people were attacked by a crow along East Coast Road on May 14. AVA on Tuesday (May 23) said it had received more than 10 pieces of feedback on crow attacks along that road since May 13. One crow and one crow's nest was removed.
A woman said 11 people were attacked by a crow along East Coast Road on May 14. AVA on Tuesday (May 23) said it had received more than 10 pieces of feedback on crow attacks along that road since May 13. One crow and one crow's nest was removed.PHOTO: SHIN MIN DAILY NEWS READER

SINGAPORE - The Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority (AVA) has removed a crow and a crow's nest after receiving more than 10 complaints about crow attacks along East Coast Road this month.

A woman who gave her name as Ms Xu told Shin Min Daily News in a report on Monday (May 22) that 11 people were attacked by a crow in the vicinity on May 14.

Ms Xu, who lives nearby, said she was attacked by a crow while passing the area. It scratched her head and she went to hospital, where she spent more than $200 to get the wound stitched up.

She said she saw 11 people - six women and five men - get attacked in the same area by the same crow on that same day.

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"Every time someone goes by, the crow will screech and swoop down to attack the passer-by," she said.

Three days after she was attacked, she said she saw a group of people chasing the bird and trying to capture it.

The AVA on Tuesday (May 23) told The Straits Times that it had received feedback on crow attacks along East Coast Road, in the vicinity of St Patrick's Green, since May 13.

"To ensure public safety, AVA conducted surveillance and took follow-up action to manage the crow population, as crows are known to attack people and pose as a potential public safety threat," said the spokesman.

One crow and one crow's nest was removed.

"During our most recent surveillance on May 20, no crows were sighted," said the AVA spokesman.

She added that crows are particularly protective of their young and may attack when fledglings are in the nest or when they sense that the fledglings are threatened.

"AVA advises the public to avoid picking up crow fledglings that may have fallen from the nests, as they might be mistaken for predators," she said.

She further advised the public to dispose of their food properly and not to feed birds, as easily available food sources will encourage birds to congregate and result in an increase in their numbers.

Mr Kalai Vanan, deputy chief executive officer of Animal Concerns Research & Education Society (Acres), told ST that Acres did not receive any calls about these specific attacks.

However, he said that crows are very intelligent birds and are more likely to be protecting their nest sites other than actively attacking people.

"In our concrete jungle, this can sometimes lead to situations where their nests are in close proximity to people and such incidents occur," he said.

"As we urbanise more, we also want to cultivate a sense of compassion and tolerance towards our environment and its inhabitants," he said.

"We (Acres) would suggest for the area to be cordoned off or have signs placed indicating the presence of protective crows and wait till the crows move away eventually or when the chicks grow up and fly away. After which, we can consider pruning the trees to make it less favourable as a future nesting spot for crows."

For more information on what to do when encountering crows, go to AVA's website, or contact the authority on 1800-476-1600 to report crow-related issues.