All you need to know about The Straits Times' July 1 revamp

(From left) SPH strategic marketing head Geoffrey Tan; ST editor Warren Fernandez; ST digital editor Eugene Leow; ST managing editor Ignatius Low; SPH marketing division's head of integrated sales and print classified Tan Ooi Boon; and SPH digital di
(From left) SPH strategic marketing head Geoffrey Tan; ST editor Warren Fernandez; ST digital editor Eugene Leow; ST managing editor Ignatius Low; SPH marketing division's head of integrated sales and print classified Tan Ooi Boon; and SPH digital division's deputy head Tan Su-Lin at the unveiling of the new features of the revamped The Straits Times at the Grand Hyatt Hotel yesterday. The major revamp is in celebration of the 170th anniversary of the newspaper. Advertisers and representatives from media agencies watching a Straits Times branding video at a media trade show yesterday to unveil the newspaper's new look - both online and in print. Award-winning design consultant Lucie Lacava, who has helped redesign more than 80 publications across the world, spearheaded the print revamp.ST PHOTOS: DESMOND WEE

SINGAPORE - A new look and new features for The Straits Times have been unveiled on July 1 across the print newspaper, website, mobile and tablet apps.

The major revamp is to celebrate the 170th anniversary of the newspaper, which published its first issue on July 15, 1845.

In the words of ST editor Warren Fernandez, the overhaul would mean a "new look, new app, but with the same Singapore soul".

New look and paywall for The Straits Times from July 1: Key changes we are introducing

Some of the key changes include a new design, a mobile-friendly website, more shareable stories and a new paywall to let readers read stories in their entirety.

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New digital model to engage more readers

Readers will be able to sample online articles from The Straits Times' digital platforms when a new metered paywall on its websites, mobile and tablet apps goes live on July 1.

Subscribers will still be able to access all Straits Times content, while non-subscribers can have a taste of  stories up to a quota each calendar month.

Each of the paper's digital platforms will entitle visitors to the same number of articles. This means that the set quota will not be shared across the broadsheet's website, mobile and tablet apps.

Readers directed to the website via social media and search engines like Google will not have those stories count towards their quotas, so as to encourage sharing and higher search rankings.

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Fresh look takes in readers' suggestions

The Straits Times' revamped newspaper and digital products were designed with readers' feedback in mind.

The mobile and tablet apps will be more stable, and have new features, while the new custom-designed font is more readable.

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