All quiet in Little India; No breaches of alcohol ban or violence reported, say Police

It was a quiet Sunday at most parts of Little India, the scene of a riot just a week ago that left 39 Home Team officers injured and 25 government vehicles damaged. A cricket game was taking place at an open field nearby when The Straits Times v
It was a quiet Sunday at most parts of Little India, the scene of a riot just a week ago that left 39 Home Team officers injured and 25 government vehicles damaged. A cricket game was taking place at an open field nearby when The Straits Times visited earlier. -- ST PHOTO: RACHEL AU-YONG 
It was a quiet Sunday at most parts of Little India, the scene of a riot just a week ago that left 39 Home Team officers injured and 25 government vehicles damaged. A cricket game was taking place at an open field nearby when The Straits Times v
It was a quiet Sunday at most parts of Little India, the scene of a riot just a week ago that left 39 Home Team officers injured and 25 government vehicles damaged. A cricket game was taking place at an open field nearby when The Straits Times visited earlier. -- ST PHOTO: RACHEL AU-YONG

It was a quiet Sunday at most parts of Little India, the scene of a riot just a week ago that left 39 Home Team officers injured and 25 government vehicles damaged.

The police said on Sunday that as of 10am, no incidents have been reported in the area, which is observing a weekend ban on the sale and public consumption of alcohol, put in place by the authorities as a cooling measure in the wake of last week's violence in the Indian ethnic enclave.

"As at 15 Dec 2013, 10am, there were no incidents reported in Little India," said a spokesman, in its second situation update in the last 12 hours. "There were also no breaches of the alcohol ban detected and no one was caught for consuming alcohol in the public places in Little India."

Business establishments along Race Course Road - the site of the fatal accident that sparked the riot - and the surrounding areas appeared to be relatively quiet, entertaining primarily local customers. That was a far cry from typical Sundays, where foreign workers normally gather to run errands, play cricket, shop, eat and drink.

A cricket game was taking place at an open field nearby when The Straits Times visited earlier. Construction worker Mr Saravana Kumar, 31, was heading towards the field where his fellow Indian nationals were already in the middle of a game.

He said he comes down to play cricket every Sunday around 8am - but only came down at 11am on Sunday as he "did not know if we could come". "But my friend called me and said everything is ok. The police are only catching those who drink so here I am," he said, adding that cricket reminds him of home.