170 young talents to strut their stuff at ChildAid

Sylvia Tan (right), an 11-year-old guzheng player, will perform with harp ensemble Rave Harpers, which also features the ChildAid concert's youngest performer this year, six-year-old harpist Kate Ching.
Sylvia Tan (above), an 11-year-old guzheng player, will perform with harp ensemble Rave Harpers, which also features the ChildAid concert's youngest performer this year, six-year-old harpist Kate Ching.ST PHOTO: DESMOND WEE

A guzheng player who plays pop music and a six-year-old harpist are among the 170 young people aged 19 and below who will wow the crowd at this year's ChildAid concert, now in its 12th year.

Guzheng player Sylvia Tan, 11, will perform with the Rave Harpers, a 20-piece harp ensemble which also features six-year-old harpist Kate Ching, the youngest ChildAid performer this year.

Ballet dancer Megan Lau, 15, who won Dancer of the Year at the Rainbow Dance Competition in Los Angeles in May, will perform and serve as one of the emcees for the evening.

The 90-minute show is organised by The Straits Times and The Business Times and produced by The Rice Company, an arts and cultural non-profit organisation. It supports two children's charities, The Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund (STSPMF) and The Business Times Budding Artists Fund (BTBAF).

The concert will also feature collaborative pieces by the young musicians, including a mash-up of pop rock band Maroon 5's Daylight.

"We facilitated the performers' imagination and experimented with different combinations to showcase the best of our performers," said ChildAid's creative director Jeremiah Choy.

Themed "Living Dreams", the concert will have a special segment that highlights the achievements of the beneficiaries of both charities.

Business Times editor Alvin Tay, who is ChildAid's co-organising chairman, said:"We hope to celebrate the dreams of those who have persevered on a road less taken and achieved success in spite of their odds, especially those who were less privileged."

STSPMF gives financial aid to children from low-income families to help them through school, while BTBAF offers fully sponsored arts training to young people from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. Last year's concert raised almost $2 million for the two charities.

Tickets will be available from Sistic from Friday. Those who wish to support the two charities can go to http://bit.do/ChildAid2016.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 27, 2016, with the headline '170 young talents to strut their stuff at ChildAid'. Print Edition | Subscribe