How to check where to cast your vote

oters can now check the Elections Department website (www.eld.gov.sg) to see where they will be casting their ballots on Sept 11.
oters can now check the Elections Department website (www.eld.gov.sg) to see where they will be casting their ballots on Sept 11.PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM WWW.ELD.GOV.SG

Voters can now check the Elections Department (ELD) website to see where they will be casting their ballots on Polling Day next Friday.

By logging onto www.eld.gov.sg, they can also print out their ePoll card. Hard copies of polling cards will be mailed to residential addresses before Polling Day.

The ELD said those who have moved, but registered their new address after Feb 1, will still vote in the constituency of their previous address.

Some 2.46 million Singaporeans, with another 4,868 overseas voters, are eligible to vote next Friday. All 89 seats are being contested for the first time since independence.

Voting at the 832 polling stations islandwide will take place from 8am to 8pm, although voters are advised by the ELD to avoid the morning peak hour. They are reminded to bring their original identity card or passport and their poll card to cast their vote. They are to mark their choice with an "X" on the ballot paper, which must be dropped into the ballot box before they leave the polling station.

The ELD is taking steps to make it easier for the elderly, physically disabled and visually impaired to vote. Factors such as safety, security and accessibility were considered in choosing polling station sites. Most are at void decks or precinct pavilions, and others are at schools or community clubs.

There will be special drop-off points at polling stations for vehicles conveying elderly or physically disabled voters. A priority queue will be set up for these voters.

Wheelchairs will also be provided for those who need them, with polling booths equipped with a lower deck so that they can mark their ballot paper more easily.

For people who are visually impaired, stencils will be provided so they can mark the ballot paper themselves without assistance, though a polling official will help if requested.

Returning Officer Ng Wai Choong said yesterday: "These are part of our ongoing efforts to enable those who are less advantaged to exercise their rights freely, and move towards a more inclusive society."

Walter Sim

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 03, 2015, with the headline 'How to check where to cast your vote'. Print Edition | Subscribe