Parliament Shorts: Equal chance for all to get NDP tickets

To the suggestion that priority be given to Pioneer Generation citizens when it comes to balloting for NDP tickets, Dr Maliki said the NDP was a major event that all Singaporeans should have an equal chance to attend.
To the suggestion that priority be given to Pioneer Generation citizens when it comes to balloting for NDP tickets, Dr Maliki said the NDP was a major event that all Singaporeans should have an equal chance to attend. ST FILE PHOTO

Equal chance for all to get NDP tickets

The National Day Parade is a major event that all Singaporeans should have an equal chance of attending, Senior Minister of State for Defence Maliki Osman said yesterday, in response to a suggestion that those in the Pioneer Generation should get priority.

Mr Lim Biow Chuan (Mountbatten) had asked if greater priority could be given to Pioneer Generation citizens when they ballot for the parade tickets.

Dr Maliki said that giving preferential allocation of tickets to any particular group will not be in line with the intent of the celebrations.

"To give greater priority to the Pioneer Generation - about 450,000 Singaporeans - will lead to reduced chances for other Singaporeans," he added.


Religious teachers trained to counter extremism

A continuing education programme that all registered Islamic religious teachers in Singapore undergo has included a module on countering extremism since 2013, said Minister-in-charge of Muslim Affairs Yaacob Ibrahim.

The Religious Rehabilitation Group (RRG), which has been counselling terror detainees since 2003, conducts the module and shares its experience in rehabilitating former Jemaah Islamiah members and helping to re-integrate them into society.

Dr Yaacob, who is Communications and Information Minister, said many religious teachers have also visited the RRG Resource and Counselling Centre at Khadijah Mosque to learn about the group's efforts in tackling extremist ideologies, especially on social media platforms.


Compulsory education no panacea for problem of non-schooling teens

Making secondary school education compulsory by law will not help to address the root causes of some young people not attending school, said Acting Education Minister (Schools) Ng Chee Meng.

He pointed out that Singapore has achieved near-universal secondary education, with only less than 1 per cent of each Primary 1 cohort not going on to complete secondary education.

To lick this problem, the Ministry of Education works with various stakeholders to track and help students who are at risk of dropping out of school or those who are already out of the school system, said Mr Ng.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 10, 2016, with the headline 'Parliament Shorts'. Print Edition | Subscribe