GE2015: NSP releases five-page party manifesto online

The National Solidarity Party released its manifesto in the form of a five-page powerpoint presentation on its website on Wednesday, Sept 2, 2015.
The National Solidarity Party released its manifesto in the form of a five-page powerpoint presentation on its website on Wednesday, Sept 2, 2015. PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI FOR THE STRAITS TIMES

SINGAPORE - The National Solidarity Party (NSP) wants to tackle four key issues during hustings: jobs, overpopulation, CPF savings and the widening income gap.

The opposition party revealed this on Wednesday in a five-page Powerpoint presentation that was posted on its website, saying it will serve as the NSP's manifesto for the Sept 11 polls.

The document is less than half the length of a 12-page manifesto the party released at the last General Election in 2011. But the NSP noted that there was "no need for a wordy manifesto as the critical issues facing the country and Singaporeans are clear".

It wants a curb on employers using cheap foreign labour to replace jobs done by "lower and middle-income Singaporeans". This may come in the form of imposing quotas on foreign professionals, managers, executives and technicians (PMETs) seeking jobs in Singapore, said the NSP in its manifesto.

Overpopulation is another issue the party hopes to tackle. It has proposed that Singapore grow its population gradually only when infrastructure is ready.

It also suggested that parents be provided with a "comprehensive security net for children" until they are 18 years old, although it did not give details on what form this security net will take.

On the issue of CPF savings, the NSP said that "less than 5 per cent" of Singaporeans "squander away their life savings". The Government should thus return the CPF Personal Life Savings to all Singaporeans aged 55 years old, and implement an opt-out scheme for excessive spenders.

"For these people, the NSP proposes that their family members be entitled to put up the case that the person's CPF Life Savings should be withheld in light of his problematic spending tendency. This is similar to the steps that family members can take if they are aware that the person could be a problematic gambler," it said.

Lastly, the NSP also suggested some changes in housing policies so as to narrow the inequality gap, which they say is widening. Among them is to allow Singaporeans to buy Housing Board flats at cost price and "also be entitled to buy another HDB apartment in the resale market". "This should be done before the immigration of foreigners into Singapore is allowed in significant numbers as these immigrants would push up the cost of housing invariably".

audreyt@sph.com.sg