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Turkey's coup that wasn't

As coups go, the Turkish effort was a study in ineptitude: No serious attempt to capture or muzzle the existing political leadership, no leader ready to step in, no communication strategy (or even awareness of social media), no ability to mobilise a critical mass within either the armed forces or society. In their place, a platoon of hapless soldiers on a bridge over the Bosporus in Istanbul and the apparently uncoordinated targeting of a few government buildings in Ankara.

It was enough for Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, speaking on his cellphone's FaceTime app, to call supporters into the streets for the insurrection to fold. That he will no doubt be the chief beneficiary of this turmoil, using it to further his push for an autocratic Islamist Turkey, does not mean that he staged it. The Turkish army remains isolated from society. It is entirely plausible that a coterie of officers believed a polarised and disgruntled society would rise up once given a cue. If so, they were wrong - and the error has cost more than 260 lives.

But in Mr Erdogan's Turkey, mystery and instability have become the coin of the realm. It is no wonder that conspiracy theories abound. Since an electoral setback in June last year, the President has overseen a Turkey that is ever more violent. This dangerous lurch has enabled him to bounce back in a second election in November and portray himself as the anointed one averting mayhem. His attempt to blame, without any evidence, the attempted coup on Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, an erstwhile ally living in Pennsylvania, forms part of a pattern of murkiness and intrigue.

Through Mr Erdogan's fog, this much seems clear: More than 35 years after the last coup, and almost two decades after the 1997 military intervention, Turks do not want a return to the seesawing military and civilian rule that characterised the country between 1960 and 1980. On the contrary, they are attached to their democratic institutions and the constitutional order. The army, a pillar of Kemal Ataturk's secular order, is weaker. Every major political party condemned the attempted coup. Whatever their growing anger against the President, Turks do not want to go backwards.

A successful coup would have been a disaster. Mr Erdogan has massive support in the Anatolian heartland, particularly among religious conservatives. Mosques all over the country were lit through the night as imams echoed the President's call for people to pour into the street. There can be little doubt that any military-controlled administration would have faced a Syria-like insurgency of Islamists and others. The blow to what is left in the Middle East of democratic institutions and the rule of law would have been devastating.

No wonder United States President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry "agreed that all parties in Turkey should support the democratically elected government of Turkey, show restraint, and avoid any violence of bloodshed". The problem is that "restraint" is not part of Mr Erdogan's vocabulary. As Mr Philip Gordon, a former special assistant to Mr Obama on the Middle East, told me: "Rather than use this as an opportunity to heal divisions, Erdogan may well do the opposite - go after adversaries, limit press and other freedoms further, and accumulate even more power." Within hours, more than 2,800 military personnel had been detained and 2,745 judges removed from duty.

Pro-Erdogan supporters at a rally near the Turkish President's house in Istanbul last Saturday after the Turkish authorities wrested back control of Ataturk airport.
Pro-Erdogan supporters at a rally near the Turkish President's house in Istanbul last Saturday after the Turkish authorities wrested back control of Ataturk airport. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

A prolonged crackdown on so-called "Gulenists", whoever Mr Erdogan deems them to be, and the Kemalist "deep state" (supporters of the old secular order) is likely. An already divided society will grow more fissured. Secular Turkey will not quickly forget the cries of "Allahu akbar" echoing last night from some mosques and from crowds in the streets.

A rapid push by Mr Erdogan to reform the Constitution through a referendum and create a presidency with sweeping executive powers is possible. He now has a case to say only such powers will keep enemies at bay.

"It may well be that democracy has triumphed in Turkey only to be strangled at a slower pace," Mr Jonathan Eyal, the international director at Britain's Royal United Services Institute, told me. There can be little doubt that the expressions of support for Mr Erdogan from western capitals came through gritted teeth.

For the Obama administration, the dilemmas of the Middle East could scarcely have been more vividly illustrated. When Egyptian general Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi led a coup three years ago against the democratically elected president, Mr Mohammed Morsi, Mr Obama did not support the democratic government, as he has now in Turkey. The administration even avoided use of the word "coup" in Egypt. In effect, the President sided with the generals in the name of order.

True, Mr Morsi was deeply unpopular. The Egyptian coup had massive support. It was a fait accompli by the time Mr Obama weighed in. Still, principles in the Middle East are worth little. Policy often amounts to choosing the least bad option.

In Turkey, the least bad - Mr Erdogan's survival - has prevailed. That does not mean much worse will not follow. A failed coup does not mean democracy is the winner. In fact, the worst of this prickly autocrat may now be unleashed upon Turkey, with the US and its allies able to do little about it.

NEW YORK TIMES

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 18, 2016, with the headline 'Turkey's coup that wasn't'. Print Edition | Subscribe