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Singapore
 

Work-life integration: Most happy but 'more can be done'

Only 6% of employees polled felt they lacked the flexibility to enjoy both

Published on Jul 19, 2014 6:44 AM
 
Office workers in the Central Business District in 2011. A comprehensive new survey of bosses and employees in Singapore has thrown up a rather surprising finding - that local workers are actually quite satisfied with their work-life integration. -- PHOTO: ST FILE 

A comprehensive new survey of bosses and employees in Singapore has thrown up a rather surprising finding - that local workers are actually quite satisfied with their work-life integration.

However, data from the survey shows that this contentment comes not from any major lasting shifts in office culture or practices, but from ad hoc benefits.

The poll, commissioned by The Straits Times and Employer Alliance (EA), took in responses from 1,000 employees and 500 employers across industries in Singapore.

"It's the most in-depth survey on work-life integration in Singapore. Most surveys on the topic would just ask about whether the workers are satisfied or not, but this one drills deep into societal norms, desires and expectations," noted Ms Sharon Kok, the director of Degree Census Consultancy, which conducted the survey.

 
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Background story

SUPERVISORS COUNT

Usually when employees are disengaged, it's not because of the work itself but because of their supervisors. If their leaders are good, working hours will not be so much of an issue.

- Employer Alliance chairman Claire Chiang


Key findings from the survey

  • 82 per cent of Singaporean employees feel they are generally in control of their work-life arrangement.
  • 87 per cent of men would be more productive at work if they had the flexibility to integrate work and personal life - versus 78 per cent of women.
  • 91 per cent of the youngest workers aged 20 to 29 would be attracted to work for companies that support them in managing work and family commitments, the highest among all age groups.
  • 60 per cent of employees aged 30 to 39, and 58 per cent of mothers with young children, would consider leaving a company that lacked flexi-work arrangements.
  • 25 per cent of employees have concerns about using flexi-work arrangements, such as negative comments from their supervisor or receiving unfavourable assignments.

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