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Indonesian island gets renewable energy, hopes to spark green power revolution

Published on May 18, 2014 11:43 AM
 
Sumbanese family gather in their house installed with electricity generated from field of small wind turbine in Kamanggih village in Sumba island located in central Indonesia. Until two years ago, most people in Kamanggih village had no power at all, but now Sumba is harnessing power from the sun, wind, rivers and even pig dung in a bid to go 100 per cent renewable by 2025. The ambitious project, called the "Iconic Island", was started by Dutch development organisation Hivos. --PHOTO: AFP

KAMANGGIH, Indonesia (AFP) - An Indonesian family of farmers eat cobs of corn outside their hut under the glow of a light bulb, as the women weave and young men play with mobile phones.

Until two years ago, most people in Kamanggih village on the island of Sumba had no power at all. Now 300 homes have access to 24-hour electricity produced by a small hydroelectric generator in the river nearby.

"We have been using the river for water our whole lives, but we never knew it could give us electricity," Adriana Lawa Djati told AFP, as 1980s American pop songs drifted from a cassette player inside.

While Indonesia struggles to fuel its fast-growing economy, Sumba is harnessing power from the sun, wind, rivers and even pig dung in a bid to go 100 percent renewable by 2025.

 
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