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Japan to unveil review of wartime sex slave apology

Published on Jun 20, 2014 12:25 PM
 
This file photo taken on Aug 4, 1993, shows Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono announcing that the government offered apologies to victims from World War II and vowed to continue its investigation into the "comfort women" issue. Japan is set to unveil on Friday a review of evidence that led to its landmark 1993 apology over wartime sex slavery, in a move that threatens to further chill ties with its neighbours. -- PHOTO: AFP

TOKYO (AFP) - Japan is set to unveil on Friday a review of evidence that led to its landmark 1993 apology over wartime sex slavery, in a move that threatens to further chill ties with its neighbours.

In what observers say is a messy compromise that looks set to satisfy no one, Prime Minster Shinzo Abe's government has said it will not reverse the apology, known as the Kono statement, which acknowledged official complicity in the practice.

Instead, the review has been examining how the decision to apologise was reached, and on what historical facts it was based.

Around 200,000 women, mainly from Korea, but also from China, Taiwan and Indonesia, were forced to work in brothels as "comfort women", serving imperial troops as Japan stomped across Asia before and during World War II.

 
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