Get a sneak preview of Sisters' Islands Marine Park

A heap of worm poop from a wandering sea worm, which can grow up to 1m long and can be as thick as its excrement. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A heap of worm poop from a wandering sea worm, which can grow up to 1m long and can be as thick as its excrement. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A teddy bear crab is able to camouflage itself in the sand easily because of its colour. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A teddy bear crab is able to camouflage itself in the sand easily because of its colour. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A bunch of sea grapes, a type of algae, growing on a rock. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A bunch of sea grapes, a type of algae, growing on a rock. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A galaxy coral (above), which got its name because it looks like it is covered with stars. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A galaxy coral (above), which got its name because it looks like it is covered with stars. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A cluster of squid eggs nestled in tape sea grass. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A cluster of squid eggs nestled in tape sea grass. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A sea cucumber that will expel its intestines – a stringy, sticky mass of white – in self-defence when its life is threatened. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A sea cucumber that will expel its intestines – a stringy, sticky mass of white – in self-defence when its life is threatened. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A fluted giant clam with purplish lips mottled with yellow. It is endangered in Singapore. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A fluted giant clam with purplish lips mottled with yellow. It is endangered in Singapore. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
Tour participants stroking a green carpet anemone (above). -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
Tour participants stroking a green carpet anemone (above). -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A hermit crab the size of a child’s palm that has outgrown its current shell and is in need of a new home. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A hermit crab the size of a child’s palm that has outgrown its current shell and is in need of a new home. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A bright yellow nudibranch, a type of sea slug. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A bright yellow nudibranch, a type of sea slug. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A crab’s exoskeleton. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
A crab’s exoskeleton. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
An anemone shrimp walking on a carpet anemone, which the shrimp lives in. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
An anemone shrimp walking on a carpet anemone, which the shrimp lives in. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
Participants on National Parks Board’s guided walks at Sisters’ Islands Marine Park touring the sea shore at low tide. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH
Participants on National Parks Board’s guided walks at Sisters’ Islands Marine Park touring the sea shore at low tide. -- ST PHOTO: STEFFI KOH

Sisters' Islands Marine Park is still being developed, but visitors can have a sneak preview on guided walks. Life!Weekend highlights key finds

Singapore’s first marine park is still under development, but there is already much biodiversity there that members of the public can see on guided walks.

At the 40ha Sisters’ Islands Marine Park, you can get up close to worms, crabs, fish, moon snails, a host of anemone and corals and even a striking nudibranch.

Life!Weekend saw these marine life forms when we joined a recent guided tour for the public.

Organised by the National Parks Board, the first introductory guided walks at the park took place over two days earlier last month. The walks were fully subscribed with about 90 members of the public being given the opportunity to observe the marine life at Big Sister’s Island.

The upcoming public guided walks to the Marine Park this month have been fully subscribed, and there are no tours next month as the tides are not favourable.

Slots for the walks in November will open on Oct 1 at midnight. Details can be found here.