The Chic Apartment

Every room in this house reflect a different scene in nature

The dining area (above) of Mr Xavier Chang’s Pasir Ris apartment has a two-layered feature wall embellished with greenery. The study room has a tree wall decal that adds to the home’s nature theme.
The dining area (above) of Mr Xavier Chang’s Pasir Ris apartment has a two-layered feature wall embellished with greenery. The study room has a tree wall decal that adds to the home’s nature theme. PHOTOS: GIN TAY FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
The dining area of Mr Xavier Chang’s (above) Pasir Ris apartment has a two-layered feature wall embellished with greenery. The study room has a tree wall decal that adds to the home’s nature theme.
The dining area of Mr Xavier Chang’s (above) Pasir Ris apartment has a two-layered feature wall embellished with greenery. The study room has a tree wall decal that adds to the home’s nature theme. PHOTOS: GIN TAY FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
The highlight of the living room is a granite feature wall made up of stone blocks.
The highlight of the living room is a granite feature wall made up of stone blocks.
Wallpaper with meadows adorns the children’s room.
Wallpaper with meadows adorns the children’s room.

The walls of logistics director Xavier Chang's condo, with earthy features, colours and decals, bring nature indoors

In Mr Xavier Chang's Pasir Ris home, every space is designed to reflect a different scene in nature.

Elements inspired by the forest, for instance, are found in the living and dining areas.

A granite feature wall made up of stone blocks is in the living room.

Mr Chang, 45, a logistics director, says: "I find the stone facade more three-dimensional and interesting than a flat wall."

He lives in the three-bedroom condominium apartment with his wife, Ms Lynn Ang, an export manager, and their two children - Edrea, 17, and Elva, 11.

In line with the nature theme, the furnishings feature earthy hues of grey and brown, as well as organic elements such as wood and stone.

The kitchen counter and cabinets have been remodelled by interior designer Thriza Teo, who runs design firm Triz Arte.


The dining area of Mr Xavier Chang’s Pasir Ris apartment has a two-layered feature wall embellished with greenery. The study room (above) has a tree wall decal that adds to the home’s nature theme. PHOTOS: GIN TAY FOR THE STRAITS TIMES

She says: "We covered the counter with vinyl and sandpapered it down for a weathered effect. This gives the furniture a patina, which makes it look more comfortable."

The dining table, which was imported from the Philippines, was purchased by Mr Chang at a furniture fair here. It is made of upcycled wood and cement, and is complemented by a set of brown leather chairs from a different furniture label.

Behind the dining table is another feature wall, which consists of two layers - the original wall was spray-painted with a stone texture and then fitted over with a layer of glass. The glass layer features frosted glass stripes to resemble a waterfall and has green shapes etched onto it to resemble leaves.

Ms Teo says: "I wanted to add a touch of nature to offset the harshness of the stone wall."

Along the corridor that leads to the bedrooms, the walls are covered in a white birch wallpaper that Mr Chang bought from Paragon Shopping Centre .

Step into the master bedroom and one will notice that the bed frame is curved. This is to create the look of a hammock.

Made of plywood and boasting a lacquer finish, the bed frame was also sandpapered to achieve the same rough look as the kitchen furniture.

Ms Teo says: "I had a vision of a hammock swaying in the sea breeze when I conceptualised this bed."

The study room is designed to mimic the experience of sitting in a garden. Bird cage lights from Singapore lighting store Eurostar Lightings and Furnishing hang from the ceiling, while elements such as a splash of green paint on the ceiling and a large tree wall decal add to the nature theme.

Wallpaper depicting meadows adorn the children's room, giving it an idyllic feel that is enhanced by a cloud-shaped light fixture that Ms Teo found in a shop in Balestier.

"I wanted the room to feel open and airy, hence the cloud light," she says. "The beds are also placed on a raised platform as I didn't want them to be boxed in by conventional frames."

The renovation, which cost $90,000 without furnishings, took 10 weeks to complete in 2013.

With such an idyllic home, it is no wonder the family enjoys staying in on weekends to watch movies and have meals together.

Mr Chang says: "We try to have dinner together whenever everyone's free. I have one house rule - no phones at the table."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 29, 2017, with the headline 'When walls unite'. Print Edition | Subscribe