The Chic Apartment

Chic apartment: Pastels and geometric shapes to brighten up a new home

In the home of Mr Raymond Seow and Ms Chen Yifang (both above), feature walls are created using geometric shapes in pastel hues (left). Turquoise mosaic tiles are also used to create a pattern on a wall in the living room (right). The geometric-shape
Turquoise mosaic tiles are also used to create a pattern on a wall in the living room (above). ST PHOTO: JOYCE FANG
In the home of Mr Raymond Seow and Ms Chen Yifang (both above), feature walls are created using geometric shapes in pastel hues (left). Turquoise mosaic tiles are also used to create a pattern on a wall in the living room (right). The geometric-shape
The geometric-shaped headboard in the master bedroom (above) is assembled from triangular wood pieces.ST PHOTO: JOYCE FANG
In the home of Mr Raymond Seow and Ms Chen Yifang (both above), feature walls are created using geometric shapes in pastel hues (left). Turquoise mosaic tiles are also used to create a pattern on a wall in the living room (right). The geometric-shape
In the home of Mr Raymond Seow and Ms Chen Yifang, feature walls are created using geometric shapes in pastel hues (above).ST PHOTO: JOYCE FANG
In the home of Mr Raymond Seow and Ms Chen Yifang (both above), feature walls are created using geometric shapes in pastel hues (left). Turquoise mosaic tiles are also used to create a pattern on a wall in the living room (right). The geometric-shape
In the home of Mr Raymond Seow and Ms Chen Yifang (both above), feature walls are created using geometric shapes in pastel hues. ST PHOTO: JOYCE FANG

Geometric shapes in various hues rule in the home of designer Raymond Seow

As the owner of an interior design firm, Mr Raymond Seow has designed many beautiful homes.

But when it came to renovating his own, he struggled to come up with the perfect theme. "I went through a few nights of insomnia," says the 45-year-old founder of Free Space Intent. "I wanted a mix of many colours and materials. I had difficulty piecing them together."

He finally picked a main palette of pink, green, blue and yellow for the three-bedroom condominium apartment in Serangoon, where he lives with his 39-year-old wife and their six-year-old son Bryden.

In the living room, he used different types of decorative tiles to create feature walls.

The wall next to the main door is lined with pearlescent tiles manufactured in the 1970s and commonly used during that period. On the cement screed wall on whichthe television set is mounted, turquoise mosaic tiles are used to create a pattern. The wall next to the dining table is decorated with pink, green, blue and yellow hexagonal tiles.

To match the colour scheme, he had the shoe cabinet and kitchen sliding door customised to include mint, pink and yellow stripes.

Wood tones in the furniture and flooring balance out the pastel hues in the 1,000 sq ft apartment. Most of the furniture, including the television console and a display rack in the living room, are from home-grown online furniture store Castlery.

The 10-week renovation cost $55,000 with furnishings.

Besides the wall tiles, the other distinctive feature in the living room is the display rack of toy collectibles. Over the years, Mr Seow has amassed figures of Star Wars characters, martial artist Bruce Lee and comic-book characters by Australian illustrator Ashley Wood.

Mr Seow believes the toys add character to the home. "A home needs to reflect the self - the toys I have reflect me. I believe that a house shouldn't just look like an impersonal showflat."

The palette continues in the master bedroom. Propped against a cheery yellow wall is a king-size bed with a geometric-shaped headboard in pastel colours. Mr Seow had sketched the design onto the wall and a designer then cut the shape out of wood and assembled the headboard from the triangular pieces.

The balcony is his wife, Ms Chen Yifang's favourite spot - she enjoys working on her laptop in the breezy space. "It's very windy here, especially in the later half of the year. We like to keep the sliding door open to make the home feel more spacious," says Ms Chen, founder of music school Focus Music.

As their son stays with his paternal grandparents on weekdays, weekends are when the family spends time bonding at home. Ms Chen says: "I'm a super chef on the weekends, usually cooking three meals a day, while he takes our son to the playground."

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 20, 2017, with the headline 'Pretty patterns'. Print Edition | Subscribe