Lap of luxury

For a cosy spot at the Palazzo Prive, head for this chaise longue. (Above) The lobby of a Fendi Private Suite. (Left) There are seven Fendi Private Suites. Amenities include Fendi Casa bed and bath linen. (Top) The Palazzo Prive has a gathering spot
Chandeliers hang from the ceiling in Palazzo Prive, a salon for top clients and VIPs, at Palazzo Fendi, Fendi’s restored flagship store and private suites hotel in Rome. PHOTOS: BLOOMBERG
For a cosy spot at the Palazzo Prive, head for this chaise longue. (Above) The lobby of a Fendi Private Suite. (Left) There are seven Fendi Private Suites. Amenities include Fendi Casa bed and bath linen. (Top) The Palazzo Prive has a gathering spot
For a cosy spot at the Palazzo Prive, head for this chaise longue.
For a cosy spot at the Palazzo Prive, head for this chaise longue. (Above) The lobby of a Fendi Private Suite. (Left) There are seven Fendi Private Suites. Amenities include Fendi Casa bed and bath linen. (Top) The Palazzo Prive has a gathering spot
The Palazzo Prive has a gathering spot for larger groups.
For a cosy spot at the Palazzo Prive, head for this chaise longue. (Above) The lobby of a Fendi Private Suite. (Left) There are seven Fendi Private Suites. Amenities include Fendi Casa bed and bath linen. (Top) The Palazzo Prive has a gathering spot
The lobby of a Fendi Private Suite.
For a cosy spot at the Palazzo Prive, head for this chaise longue. (Above) The lobby of a Fendi Private Suite. (Left) There are seven Fendi Private Suites. Amenities include Fendi Casa bed and bath linen. (Top) The Palazzo Prive has a gathering spot
There are seven Fendi Private Suites. Amenities include Fendi Casa bed and bath linen.

Italian label Fendi's restored and opulent flagship store in Rome includes an exclusive suite and hotel rooms

ROME • Italian luxury brand Fendi unveiled its restored Palazzo Fendi palace in central Rome last Thursday as it seeks to woo the richest shoppers.

After a refurbishment lasting about a year, the building will include Fendi's flagship store, a "by- invitation-only" suite, a seven-room hotel and a roof restaurant.

The customer experience "will link that person to our brand", chief executive officer Pietro Beccari said in an interview. "It's a place to cement a relation," he said.

Fendi is mirroring the strategy of another luxury brand Louis Vuitton to make even the wealthiest customers feel special. Both labels are part of France's LVMH.

Maintaining exclusivity is becoming more challenging for luxury labels as the industry's growth slows amid collapsing demand in China and a strengthening dollar.

It's a place to cement a relation.

MR PIETRO BECCARI, chief executive officer of Fendi, on the restored Palazzo Fendi

Mr Beccari said Fendi is looking at Australia and Canada as potential new markets as it seeks to keep up last year's revenue growth.

"There are areas where we want to be present with physical stores opening, but also with e-commerce," he added.

Online, Fendi is targeting Japan among several countries where it is looking to apply a policy of charging the same price as it does in shops.

Mr Beccari said he is not overly concerned by the slowdown in China's growth. "For a luxury brand, China is a must-go market," he said.

BLOOMBERG

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 12, 2016, with the headline 'Lap of luxury'. Print Edition | Subscribe